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smokelessfire
10-19-2007, 12:27 PM
can anyone explain the proper way to fire harden a spear tip etc. the book i read wasn't too clear, and it didn't say what the end result would look and feel like. i sharpened it to a point, then put it into the fire, rotating it, then rubbed the black part on a rock. it seems to just scrape it off and theres new wood underneath. what am i doing wrong?

MCBushbaby
10-19-2007, 03:54 PM
http://www.jstor.org/view/00027316/ap010091/01a00130/0

corndog-44
10-20-2007, 01:21 AM
can anyone explain the proper way to fire harden a spear tip etc. the book i read wasn't too clear, and it didn't say what the end result would look and feel like. i sharpened it to a point, then put it into the fire, rotating it, then rubbed the black part on a rock. it seems to just scrape it off and theres new wood underneath. what am i doing wrong?

Sounds like you're over-charring the point.

The fire hardening process removes moisture from the wood by slowly and lightly charring it over a fire. This process also causes the resins in the wood to harden giving it a stronger, durable point.

FVR
10-20-2007, 08:49 AM
I will "fire harden" bamboo but we call it tempering. Don't use flame, well sometimes to give it a nice look but it's tricky as it will burn.

I use hot coals and the heat mostly dries out the green wood. The idea like in the movies where they stick a point in the fire to harden, maybe for woods like teak and hickory when they are green.

flandersander
11-11-2007, 12:04 PM
I will "fire harden" bamboo but we call it tempering. Don't use flame, well sometimes to give it a nice look but it's tricky as it will burn.

I use hot coals and the heat mostly dries out the green wood. The idea like in the movies where they stick a point in the fire to harden, maybe for woods like teak and hickory when they are green.

Great advice! I know i'll use this!

dilligaf2u2
11-11-2007, 12:10 PM
I bury the stick 8 to 10 inches under the ground and built a fire over it. If the dirt over the stick is loose, it will harden the wood without charing it. I have done this for arrows and spear points.

Don

Bladesypher
11-16-2007, 07:16 PM
Well... this is my first post, I just found this website tonight and I like it...

I personally have used this technique a few times before.. however normally for tent pegs. The trick is to get a fire going, then place the weapon in the ash at the bottom of the fire as it burns for a while until it goes brown but isnt scorched. Remember to cover it in ash to suffocate it of oxygen (as this may cause it to set alight). This is a good method for making temporary wooden tools long-term ones. I hope I helped :) .