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View Full Version : Meat Packing....or How to build/buy a pack for hauling Meat



Sourdough
09-12-2008, 04:01 PM
How do you build or modify a pack to haul heavy loads of meat. Hauling 75# or 120# or more of meat is not like packing camping gear.

1) It is easier if the meat is NOT boned out.

2) Bungee cord helps, but you still need good rope.

3) Put eye-bolts where the clevis-pins are now, and secure with nylock nuts.

4) A spacer like an upside down bucket or waste pan or a aluminum pot can be placed inverted in the bottom of the pack to get the weight higher. Boned out meat goes straight to the bottom of the pack with no spacer.

5) With bone in meat wrap the sharp ends of the cut bone with extra game bags, gloves etc. as the sharp bone can cut through your pack quickly.

6) place the meaty part up and the less meaty part down.

7) you can not lash the meat to tight to the frame, and after 50 steps you will need to tighten it up again. Put the bungees on top over the rope.

8) No professional packs meat in an internal-frame pack.

9) A plain naked external-frame pack with a seat or platform type shelf works the best.

10) If you use a external frame that has a bag on it you can rope off the lower part be for putting in the meat.

11) Lots of game bags, lots of eye-bolts for lashing, lots of bungees, and the best external frame you can afford.

12) Remember you are walking bear bait when packing fresh killed meat. Better to 86 the cargo, than terminate the bear.

13) And if you are real good at packing meat you can always find work. The pay is $50.00 per day, plus two meals. And you only work 14 to 16 hours per day. And the season is over in about 95 Days......:)

wildWoman
09-13-2008, 03:32 PM
Thanks, that's great and very useful info!

Rick
09-13-2008, 06:39 PM
That's a great post, Hopeak!!

SARKY
09-14-2008, 03:13 PM
Check out Kifaru packs at Kifaru.com. Their packs are extremely well built. Many of them are modular so you can alter them to many things including haul meat. Also the pack are rated as if you can carry it the pack will hold it. I put this to the test hauling rocks. after filling the pack with rocks I had to pull myself up to my feet with the help of a tree. My knees were wobbling but I was able to haul the rocks 100 yards to my truck.

Bibow
09-16-2008, 09:14 PM
good advice, always something to learn eh

50x95=4070+190 meals = hmmm...

trax
09-17-2008, 06:04 PM
excellent job on that hopeak.

vanguard1
09-18-2008, 09:25 PM
Dumb question alert!

If you're sacking around between 75 - 120# of meat, would it not be easier on you to construct an a-frame type 'sled' to pack the meat on and pull behind you, of course design would vary according to terrain.

My understanding is dress out fairly far off from your camp site to prevent inviting 'everyone' over for a free meal and the thought of backpacking it would consume more energy than required.

Please set me straight. :)

Sourdough
09-18-2008, 10:44 PM
Dumb question alert!

If you're sacking around between 75 - 120# of meat, would it not be easier on you to construct an a-frame type 'sled' to pack the meat on and pull behind you, of course design would vary according to terrain.

My understanding is dress out fairly far off from your camp site to prevent inviting 'everyone' over for a free meal and the thought of backpacking it would consume more energy than required.

Please set me straight. :)

Well I am not sure I fully understand your question......We have packed Moose out 8 miles, across rivers, cliffs, But mostly it is swamps, and or Alder jungles. Most packs are one to three miles. But Dall Sheep might be a 15 mile pack. Many areas are walk-in only. I should point out that some places the nearest tree is 130 miles.

Bibow
09-19-2008, 07:56 PM
vanguard i believe what your talking about is at travois, and is probably easier and cheaper.
what i think would be a good idea is not constructing where you drop your game but building one when you do have trees around and dragging you gear on it until you drop something than just leave your gear at camp or just where your stuff (backpack) and drag around the travois till you need it. but of course you can't use it in all types of terrain.

vanguard1
09-22-2008, 07:15 PM
See? Glad I asked the question - I would have not thought of there being no trees to construct a frame to load the meat on. Also - packing across the terrain mentioned makes much more sense than dragging a frame loaded with meat.

Thanks, my thinking is now expanded. There I was..living in a flat world, full of trees again!

DOGMAN
09-23-2008, 12:03 PM
I have used a travois, a little cart,and a pack frame to pack Elk, moose and goats out of Wilderness Areas. A pack frame is by far the easiest way to go. The travois is awkward to use on anything other than flat grassy, or snowy terrain- plus after a while it really starts to hurt your hands, forearms and shoulders. The cart I've used is my father-in-laws and he and I hate that thing. It is aluminum, has one wheel, a hand break- and is hard to keep a balanced load. Tough to pull up a hill, and hard to stop on a steep descent. It was obviously designed for deer on the flats- not Elk in the mountains!

The pack frame when loaded well, is the easiest, human powered way to pack out meat. It is heavy, tough work- but highly functional and efficent. Carts and travois just don't cut it- at least were I hunt.

On a side note- horses and mules are my favorite way to pack out big game! If you know what your doing, you can get half a bull elk draped over a sawbuck with very minimum field butchering. FOr the back half, Saw it in half, keep the hide on, cut holes in the hide than lay the carcass over the horse- poke the sawbucks through the holes in the hide and have the legs hanging over. saw the legs off at the knees to keep them from sticking out to much. For the front half- do the same thing- but cut the head off at the lower neck were it meets the shoulder and do the same thing. This is way quicker and simpler than quartering.

A few years ago my father shot a giant bull, and his neighbor was able to go pick it up with a front end loader and put it right on a flatbed! Now that was easy.

Sourdough
09-07-2009, 01:35 PM
Speaking of Back Packs in the existing sticky.......are there any posts here that could be duplicated into the sticky on packs......?

TomChemEngineer
09-07-2009, 08:08 PM
Good posts. I tend to avoid bungees for tying stuff down because they stretch around and let the load shift whether it is on a cart, in the back of the pickup truck, or on my back, but your mileage may vary. Secured ropes and knots and paracords are my friend. I never used a travois, but I remember reading about them in grade school. There was always a horse pulling them, though, which I figure is a lot easier than me pulling it! It would work in the right conditions... as they did for the plains Indians. I guess I'm an ALICE frame and tied rope kinda guy.