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Beo
03-13-2008, 09:54 AM
What would you do?
Itís going to happen. Sooner or later, the power will go off, and you wonít know when (or if) it will come back on. This doesnít have to be the work of evil-doers, either. It could be a sudden ice storm that brings down the power lines. It could result from other severe weather such as a tornado or hurricane, or from a disruption caused by faulty power company equipment, or even something as simple as a tree branch falling on your own personal segment of the grid, or yes even a SHTF scenario. The effect is the same: everything electrical in your home stops working.
For most modern Americans, the loss of power means the complete loss of normalcy. Their lifestyle is so dependent upon the gridís constancy that they do not know how to function without it. How do you cook a meal if your gas stove has an electric ignition? How do your children find their way to the bathroom at night if the light switches donít work? How do you keep warm if your wood heat is moved through ducts by an electric fan? What do you do with a freezer full of expensive meat? How do you find out what is happening in your area with the TV and radio silent? What will you drink if your water comes from a system dependent on electrical pumps?
So what would you do, or what will you do?
I'm just curious.

rebel
03-13-2008, 10:35 AM
Are you saying I might have to survive? Where are the safety nets we pay for? I know we have the government to take care of us! Someone would just have to come out and take care of me! If they didn't, I'd sue.

BraggSurvivor
03-13-2008, 10:53 AM
I'm ready, bring it on! :)

Beo
03-13-2008, 11:00 AM
Ahhh yes but what would you do?

wareagle69
03-13-2008, 11:30 AM
I'm ready, bring it on! :)

go play with your tractor kitt cat

great question. this is what i prepare for more than anything else. i remember the outage back in 04 was it in august had just moved into a new apt back when i was single and not as prepared(can take care of myself just fine) i did take allot of notes during the next 48 hours gave me allot to go on..

I for one think that the terroists will have been trying to figure how to take out our power the towers were symbolic but to take out let say niagara generating station would leave millons w/o power and the grid way over loaded so i prepare for long term outage

but to your question, i have a wood stove that does my primary heat so that fixes staying warm, next would be food prep i have a 20ft long travel trailer that would be my kitchen runs on propane and i have plenty propane stored.
water and frezzer i am currently working on since i have a deep well pump i am currently looking at solar options but that is still a bit away so if it happened right now i have a natural spring out back plus a fair amount of stored water. also a propane fridge/ freezer in the trailer helps a bit if it was summer, ok so for general lighting at night i have a few lantern with oil lots of oil stored plus lanterns that hold tea light candles and i've put hooks in the ceiling that would keep them elevated and safe from being knocked over thus reducing my fire risk also have solar flashlights and my dewalt and rigid power tool 18volt that are on solar chargers for my flashlights and have the dewalt radio and also a solar radio
my biggest diffuculty is i would not be able to waste my time away on this forum would probably go thru withdrawls but might get my chores done on time. good topic though like i said this is the emergency i see most likely to happen as i have already experienced many in my life already..


always be prepared..prepare all ways

trax
03-13-2008, 11:35 AM
Been there, done that, winter of '87, two weeks without electricity in northern Manitoba, ask me a tough one. Keep a fire going, cook food and heat water on the same woodstove. Use candles and flashlights, teach the family to bundle up better and maybe use more blankets. Entertain yourselves with things like board games, card games, guitar playing, and oh my God! ...conversations....anyone remember those? We had them prior to tv.

Beo
03-13-2008, 11:37 AM
Okay so it wasn't so hard.

Canadian-guerilla
03-13-2008, 12:13 PM
the only thing i would miss is my computer/internet
i have my crank shortwave/am-fm radio
(if there would be anything out there to pick up)

other than that, get up with the sun, go to bed early

i would feel bad for the young'uns (4-12 yrs)
they've always lived with electricity ( in north america )
they don't know/care where it comes from - it's just there
and the lost of something that stable, who knows what effect it would have on kids

Sourdough
03-13-2008, 12:17 PM
This is why I am trying to decide 6 KW or 8 KW diesel generator. I did not understand that the generator needs a 75% to 95% load and that the load needs to be non-static.

I had thought bigger was better, turns out not so. A mistake in this area is expensive.

Alpine_Sapper
03-13-2008, 01:00 PM
How do you cook a meal if your gas stove has an electric ignition?

Propane and a camp stove. And no, I don't have to go to the store to re-stock. If I can find natural fuel use it in place to expand the stocks.



How do your children find their way to the bathroom at night if the light switches donít work?


Night vision goggles! Seriously, open the blinds on the windows so there is some ambient light, but for the most part my family know there way around their home environment to be able to move without light. You might bang a shin once or twice, but eventually you remember that table is there, or move the effin thing. If the kid is afraid of the dark you may have to escort them.



How do you keep warm if your wood heat is moved through ducts by an electric fan?


In that situation, seal a room, and keep everone in the same room. Body heat, blankets, and insulate it as well as you can. some heat sources should be available if you're prepared, and hell, if it's life or death and freezing cold, set the couch on fire!



What do you do with a freezer full of expensive meat?


Eat well for a while. If you can, preserve it so it lasts. If it's so cold I'm having to worry about keeping my family alive to prevent cold weather injuries it shouldn't be that big of an issue, whereas here in Texas, I'd be making jerkey. :)



How do you find out what is happening in your area with the TV and radio silent?


Am I stuck in the house? Probably not. If I am, who cares what's going on until I get out?



What will you drink if your water comes from a system dependent on electrical pumps?


Water is always available from some source. If it's cold, you can get it from snow. If not, go effin find it. Everyone knows how to boil water, right? With no purification method, a bag still would work for the immediate short term, and a solar still or something similar for the future. If you're going to be there a while, dig a well. :rolleyes:

hillbilly1987
03-13-2008, 01:19 PM
well i am all prepared for no electricity so i have alot of candles and matches and a am/fm/shortwave scanner and a police handheld scanner that takes batteries and i also have alot of flash lights and im all set for anything to happen here but ya i do feel bad also for the 4-12 year olds

bulrush
03-13-2008, 03:38 PM
Been there done that. If I see a big storm coming, I fill 5g buckets (all I can find) with water for toilet flushing. I also fill the bathtub for toilet flushing. I fill lots of other jugs for drinking water.

Each person gets their own flashlight. When it gets dark, I light a candle in the bathroom for a little ambient light, and for...odors. We play card games, board games, read (if it's daylight), shovel snow, whatever. Most power outages happened to me during spring ice storms. Trees fall on power lines, and the power goes out.

For cooking I use a camp stove I put on my real stove. I heat up cans of beans, veggies, open cans of fruit, whatever.

For sleeping, I get out the sleeping bag. I have bunk beds in a small bedroom. If necessary I can seal off the top or bottom bunk bed with blankets used for walls (did it in college too). I wear a knit hat, socks, use sleeping bag and blankets, usually I'm plenty warm. Never had to use "blanket walls".

Surprisingly, a full size blanket can be pinned to the ceiling with about 10-15 push pins, and it really stays up there. I didn't believe it when I heard it, then I saw someone do it. It really works. It's hilarious if you're trying to sleep then your roomate brings his girlfriend over, thinking you're asleep, then the bed starts shaking.

At night you could also pitch a tent in the largest space the tent will fit in, like your living room or basement. The small space inside the tent will help conserve heat. Popup tents with shock poles work best for this. You can't stake it in your house.

It's really no big deal. I also have a solar battery charger, but I use LED lamps and they last 7-10 days minimum anyway, so I've never used the charger. I also have lots of candles for room light at night.

One time we had an ice storm, power was out for 4 days. We had a gas heater, but no blower, so I kept the heater on all night and slept next to the fireplace in a sleeping bag. I was plenty warm. I was only worried about the pipes freezing during the day when I was at work (work still had power). I took cold baths each morning, but you get used to it. A cup of hot tea after an icy bath really helps you warm up.

When my son was smaller I could tease him, but now he doesn't believe me. I might say "Sh! I think I hear a snipe!"

I've listened to the radio several times during power outages but I don't anymore. Either the station is offline, or they never mention when the power is coming back on. The power will come on when it comes on.

wareagle69
03-13-2008, 03:46 PM
one thing i really want to cuation people is an open flame candles and such never leave a room with a candle lit in there if you noticed in my post i have gone to the length of making sure my candles and lanterns cannot get knocked over or come in contact with combustibles. haveing you house catch on fire during an emergency is catasrophic and response time is slower so ALWAYS be cautious with an open flame..


always be prepared-prepare all ways...

bulrush
03-13-2008, 03:46 PM
Ok, to purify water you boil it for 10 minutes. What if my watch battery dies? Is there a 10 minute egg timer? How else can I time something for 10 minutes?

I guess I could get a taper candle before my stopwatch dies, let it burn for 10 minutes, then make equal marks down the side representing 10 minutes.

Anyone have any other ideas if you don't have a stop watch? Do they even sell wind up stop watches anymore?

Oh wait, I have my grandpa's wind-up watch. At least I think it's wind up. Oh wait, I have an old wind-up alarm clock. That should do it. Yous guys got brains.

Canadian-guerilla
03-13-2008, 04:18 PM
What if my watch battery dies? . . . . . How else can I time something for 10 minutes?



anyone miss work in the morning because the power went out overnight ?
when that happens enough times ( over years ), you make corrections
now every clock at my place is battery driven
something small, with an alarm, using one AA or AAA battery
one battery is good for at least a year in these little things
and a pk of 4 batteries should be good for awhile

folding travel alarm clock

http://www.citylivingstores.com/mas_assets/full/184435.jpg

Ole WV Coot
03-13-2008, 04:56 PM
I would go outside, start the generator, disconnect from the power grid and use it only for the blower in the Buck insert downstairs plus other circuits. I split and added circuits years ago so I could always have power in every room from at least one outlet & light. I have a couple of rotary dial telephones also, hooked up. No electricity, bye bye cordless and fancy new phones.

wareagle69
03-13-2008, 05:06 PM
I would go outside, start the generator, disconnect from the power grid and use it only for the blower in the Buck insert downstairs plus other circuits. I split and added circuits years ago so I could always have power in every room from at least one outlet & light. I have a couple of rotary dial telephones also, hooked up. No electricity, bye bye cordless and fancy new phones.

you guys have electricity in west by gawd virginia hmm learn sumn new everyday

Catfish
03-13-2008, 07:16 PM
In addition to the snow, we get some fairly major windstorms here in winter and it's not uncommon for the power to go out. So far (touch wood) we've never been without for more than a few hours but earlier this year, people not too far from here had no electricity for 3-4 days.

We have candles, oil lanterns, camping stoves and gas. And if those run out, there's a fire pit and wood outside. We have a well, which relies on an electrical pump but if needs be, that could be overridden. I work from home and need the Internet, but as long as I can go somewhere with a wireless connection I can get by.

Mostly, I find it's just a case of breaking habits. I go to switch on the TV, or play on the computer, then have an "Oh, right." moment. Other than that, I really quite enjoy it.

canid
03-13-2008, 07:28 PM
when i live without electricity, i tend to watch less tv. i actually sow a stronger work ethic. i get bored more easily, so i generally work on more projects. if i where holding a job, i'd invest in a solar clock, or a battery powered clock and a mechanical or solar powered small charging system.

other than that, i'd read more and keep more regular sleeping hours. that is pretty much the bulk of the impact it would have on my life.

BraggSurvivor
03-13-2008, 07:28 PM
This is why I am trying to decide 6 KW or 8 KW diesel generator. I did not understand that the generator needs a 75% to 95% load and that the load needs to be non-static.

I had thought bigger was better, turns out not so. A mistake in this area is expensive.


1000' of intermediate electric perimeter fence (for cattle), couple 1500w water heaters, tractor plugged in, and running all your house needs, it doesnt take long to get to 75% in a hurry.

Add a hot tub and your good to go.....:D

I have all home circuits hooked up on my generator including the quonset/barn and the wife can still dry a load of laundry.

amranch
03-13-2008, 10:23 PM
Howdy,i live on the west coast,i wouldn't freeze to death,also have small gen & vehicle chargers & adapters,oil lights,propane stuff,etc.

spud
03-13-2008, 11:27 PM
Spud...good questions. As for us we wait for an hour or two. If in the middle of the night an alarm goes off (quiet) and let me know power is down. My job to deal with it. In the mornig I get up and tend to the German Shepherds. Then cross over the grass to the undergound diesel 40 KW generator and fire that puppy up.... Ahhhh, the power. Now for the Starbucks coffee fresh ground in bed for my wonderful lovely wife :):) She loves that. But of course if it fails, the 17,000 KW back up unit is ready to be put on line. Alas if that fails, the 8,000KW diesel back up unit is fired up. If it fails?? Bad news on the coffee deal. How long can they run on our fuel reserves...? Two years at least as needed, as planned for. Yes we can run the A/c, hot tub, ovens and other fun stuff. We do this every year when the tower trees come down on the feeder lines to our ranch. Be prepared, as they taught me in the "Boy Scouts". Generators rock.... spud

canid
03-13-2008, 11:55 PM
yeah, if you ended up having 3 generators fail at once, likely there are worse problems than a power outage. heh.

Ole WV Coot
03-14-2008, 09:59 AM
Hey Wareagle, don't tell anybody but we stole some from Ohio. I know this is shocking to everyone but we can generate a few good men to go across the Big Sewer and "borrow" watt we want. Next trip is to Ashland Oil and "borrow" some gas.

bulrush
03-14-2008, 01:33 PM
I also have a touch-tone telephone, not cordless, which gets its power from the phone line.

Someone mentioned they have a rotary phone. In Michigan, all phone equipment the phone companies use has been converted to touch-tone, rotary is no longer supported. Is that true in other states too? This was completed several years ago.

BraggSurvivor
03-14-2008, 01:48 PM
I dont think they are supported but will still work, around here anyways. Have you ever tried to find a rotary lately?

canid
03-14-2008, 01:49 PM
i don't even see them at thrift stores or garage sales anymore. i think they've become that most special kind of obsolete; collectible.

BraggSurvivor
03-14-2008, 01:52 PM
There's gotta be a Grandma out there that has one. :D

My buddy is into retro and tried to find one for his house. Five months later found it for $45.00. What a rip for and ugly phone.

BraggSurvivor
03-14-2008, 02:09 PM
If all else fails I'll call the kids in for supper with one of these:


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v258/Bructer/DSC00670.jpg

Rick
03-14-2008, 02:45 PM
The answer is, yes they do. (See, Coot know what he's talking about). Rotary phones worked with mechanical, rotary switches. When touch call rolled out, DTMF converters were added to the mechanical switches to convert the touch tone back to mechanical pulses (and you thought you were so up to date). Today's digital switches will accept either touch tone or rotary inputs and both work just fine.

Having said that, there could be exceptions out there. A lot of companies manufacture central office switches so there may be some odd ball I don't know about. But the phones will certainly work with the major manufacturers.

Now, I just need to figure out how to make my magneto and common battery phones work.:D

Beo
03-14-2008, 03:01 PM
Smoke signals is waaaaaaaaaaay easier.:D

Rick
03-14-2008, 03:18 PM
To your answer question, Bragg. Not much. I have kerosene lamps and a kerosene heater. I also have a propane heater and way too many propane tanks. I have a large box fireplace that I can cook over if I had to and a good supply of wood. Plenty of candles. Several camping stoves (wood, alcohol and iso-butane/propane mix). 50 gallon hot water heater, two 5 gallon storage cans or water. A lake with a over 100 miles of shore line just down the road if I need more. My little sweetwater filter will pump it dry (Okay, enough for us to drink anyway). Plenty-o-food to last several weeks. If it turned bitter cold, I have canvas tarps I could seal off whatever part of the house I needed to.

BraggSurvivor
03-14-2008, 03:42 PM
To your answer question, Bragg. Not much. I have kerosene lamps and a kerosene heater. I also have a propane heater and way too many propane tanks. I have a large box fireplace that I can cook over if I had to and a good supply of wood. Plenty of candles. Several camping stoves (wood, alcohol and iso-butane/propane mix). 50 gallon hot water heater, two 5 gallon storage cans or water. A lake with a over 100 miles of shore line just down the road if I need more. My little sweetwater filter will pump it dry (Okay, enough for us to drink anyway). Plenty-o-food to last several weeks. If it turned bitter cold, I have canvas tarps I could seal off whatever part of the house I needed to.

Wrong post I think Rick. Good story though.:D

Rick
03-14-2008, 03:44 PM
Right thread, wrong author. Sorry.

Beo - ..........

crashdive123
03-14-2008, 04:25 PM
What would you do?
It’s going to happen. Sooner or later, the power will go off, and you won’t know when (or if) it will come back on. This doesn’t have to be the work of evil-doers, either. It could be a sudden ice storm that brings down the power lines. It could result from other severe weather such as a tornado or hurricane, or from a disruption caused by faulty power company equipment, or even something as simple as a tree branch falling on your own personal segment of the grid, or yes even a SHTF scenario. The effect is the same: everything electrical in your home stops working.
For most modern Americans, the loss of power means the complete loss of normalcy. Their lifestyle is so dependent upon the grid’s constancy that they do not know how to function without it. How do you cook a meal if your gas stove has an electric ignition? How do your children find their way to the bathroom at night if the light switches don’t work? How do you keep warm if your wood heat is moved through ducts by an electric fan? What do you do with a freezer full of expensive meat? How do you find out what is happening in your area with the TV and radio silent? What will you drink if your water comes from a system dependent on electrical pumps?
So what would you do, or what will you do?
I'm just curious.

I live in a climate where too warm is more of a concern than too cold. I've got gas for the generators, batteries, lanterns, candles, flashlights, crank radios, small fans to help keep cool. We can run the AC off our larger generator but porbably wouldn't in order to conserve fuel. We already use battery operated candles for night lights - for longer term would probably use light sticks (big supply on hand) to conserve batteries.

Rick
03-14-2008, 05:25 PM
Florida does funny plumbing. I've seen it get down to freezing in the Tampa area on rare occasion. They have plumbing running inside the outside walls and they generally have water running inside the walls when that happens.

crashdive123
03-14-2008, 05:53 PM
Plumbers get pretty busy around here when we get a hard freeze. Mostly the off-grade homes with the uninsulated pipes beneath them.

spud
03-14-2008, 08:04 PM
Spud... Now I was kidding a little about any generator failing right off the bat. Don't get so serious:):) In the long haul over several years of a resulting disaster where no power was available or always on... multiple generators are just a move in the direction of...wisdom. If on goes down...got parts? Get parts? Not hardly. So hook in the back up. Simple as that. Our whole group runs deep on redundant back up. Do you? If you are on watch or whatever and must fire your weapon...then it fails or breaks...what then. Got back up right there, same gun, same mags, etc.? We do as we see the lives of our group more important then what it costs to back up all systems we can. Same for generators...we all want good clean water and plenty of it. The bottom line here is... if it is worth doing at all, it is worthy doing right, with back up. Everything breaks. Take care....

canid
03-14-2008, 08:56 PM
who's serious? i try to be a smartarse whenever possible, don't mind me ;)

as far as redundance goes, i've had that fail on me in the past. almost got me killed, but oh well, you can't win 'em all.

Rick
03-14-2008, 09:14 PM
I like multiple backups, too. But then you have to have so many of those beep beep thingys going at once it's hard to hear. And just a bit annoying. And, of course, if one person stops....well...it's sort of a slow motion pile up. Nasty.

I'm glad you're all right Canid. Sounds like that could have been very bad.

Alpine_Sapper
03-14-2008, 10:35 PM
who's serious? i try to be a smartarse whenever possible, don't mind me ;)

as far as redundance goes, i've had that fail on me in the past. almost got me killed, but oh well, you can't win 'em all.

that's why you pmcs your backups too. :)

GVan
03-14-2008, 11:24 PM
As I sit here reading these things I.m about readr to split a gut laughing.

Ever since I was knee high and Hilda hit Louisiana, I've grown up with hurricanes every couple of years, or so. It's hot because it's summer, so you open the blinds ans windows all through the house. There's a lot of light in moonlight once your eyes become acustomed to the darkness.
We always have acouple of boxes of candles in the hall pantry.

Gas stoves can always be lit with a match. Check the owner's manual or send an email to the manufacturer.

Have an electric stove?? Thy burning scrap wood found in the neighborhood in your B-B-Q grill. You haven't lived till you burn busted up 2X4's in a $1000 gas grill that's out of gas just to heat up a can of syew.

Tell the kids that you're going camping in the back yard. Pitch the family tent. Make a camp fire and cook up all the food in the refridgerator and freezer, before it spoils, and call the neighbors over.

Every in here has studied survival to some degree. Just think survival and make the best of the situation. And and above all, HAVE FUN.

GVan
03-14-2008, 11:33 PM
Are you saying I might have to survive? Where are the safety nets we pay for? I know we have the government to take care of us! Someone would just have to come out and take care of me! If they didn't, I'd sue.

The American Government is here to rule you not to serve you.
This is real life not high school civics.:eek:

This is not a democracy, it.s a representative government. And who do the represent?,...the 1%ers. The top 1 percent of the most wealthy and powerful individuals of this country, and they'er not all citizens sorry to say.
The new government has already been chosen, and the election process is nothing more than a dog and pony show.

BraggSurvivor
03-14-2008, 11:38 PM
The American Government is here to rule you not to serve you.
This is real life not high school civics.:eek:

This is not a democracy, it.s a representative government. And who do the represent?,...the 1%ers. The top 1 percent of the most wealthy and powerful individuals of this country, and they'er not all citizens sorry to say.
The new government has already been chosen, and the election process is nothing more than a dog and pony show.



Amen brother!

Rick
03-15-2008, 09:07 AM
This just in.....paranoia runs rampant....giant conspiracy includes aliens....department of defense run by sharks....

Not to point at any one individual but all of you because a LOT believe the same way...

How many of you that believe the government is a problem serve in some governmental capacity? School board, county board, etc. etc.? How many even bother to vote?

If you think it's a problem, then do something creative and change it from the inside. Can you really think that every politician that ever ran successfully for an office is part of the conspiracy?

The preceding was an unpaid, unpolitical announcement.

crashdive123
03-15-2008, 01:43 PM
We're from the government, and we're here to help.:eek::eek::eek::eek:

http://americangirlsareeasy.com/photos/area51/02aliens.JPG

FVR
03-15-2008, 02:08 PM
This happened a few weeks back.

Have about 4 or 5 big flashlights, plenty of batteries. More candles than you can imagine, if safely placed will light up the house.

Few cords of wood in the yard, fireplace, and a grill.

Also have two propane tanks and two propane grills, actually one grill and one stove.

Water is not an issue as cooking and heat are not also.

BIG ISSUE:::::::::::

Food storage.

The freezer will get put on the generator, not constant but a few hours at a time. May need to get some gas in storage. The gen. has two outlets and the second outlet will be used for the fridge or the tv (for the news) or a radio.


Short term, we'll be okay. Long term, may need to make a few changes.

Assassin Pilot
03-15-2008, 08:05 PM
i would feel bad for the young'uns (4-12 yrs)
they've always lived with electricity ( in north america )
they don't know/care where it comes from - it's just there
and the lost of something that stable, who knows what effect it would have on kids

Psh, it won't kill them. Probably help them if anything. Teach them a thing or 2 about how electricity comes to your house, and why it may go out. I know for a fact that a 4 year old could easily grasp the concept of "generator --> power lines --> house." You could also spend more time with them, showing them a few survival things on the way. They will be very interested in it after the first day of "nothing to do." :rolleyes:

At least I know I would be if I was that age (I'm in high school)

Rick
03-15-2008, 08:31 PM
They could grasp the concept.....for about three minutes. At that age is not about understanding, it's about attention span. They'd forget it as quick as you explained it. Unless, of course, it's what time Sponge Bob comes on or Dora the Explorer. I'm a map, I'm a map, I'm a map. No swiping Swiper!

The fridge should be good for about 8 hours and the freezer about 10 hours if you don't fan the doors. Check your owners manual and see if the times are listed.

If the freezer is a chest type, then cover it with blankets to help insulate it. Just be sure and remove them when the power comes back on.

A full freezer will stay colder longer than an empty one. If your freezer is only part full, consider freezing tubs of water in advance (empty ice cream tubs are ideal).

rebel
03-15-2008, 09:09 PM
My freezer died last summer. I must have caught it just after it happened. I did just as you said. Put blankets over it then went to sears. When they delivered the next day (20+hours later) the stuff was still frozen.

marberry
03-15-2008, 10:04 PM
i have a well and a generator ^_^ planning on buying some solar panels sometime aswell.

wareagle69
03-15-2008, 10:52 PM
i like putting water in my freezer to help keep everything frozen(can anyone say free ice) then it also acts as water storage two birds one stone

always be prepared-prepare all ways

Stony
03-16-2008, 08:51 AM
kerosin lamps,
white gas lamps,
candles,
solar power,
wood stoves,
re-charge batteries (with solar),
a.s.o.

Assassin Pilot
03-16-2008, 10:45 AM
They could grasp the concept.....for about three minutes. At that age is not about understanding, it's about attention span. They'd forget it as quick as you explained it. Unless, of course, it's what time Sponge Bob comes on or Dora the Explorer. I'm a map, I'm a map, I'm a map. No swiping Swiper!

The fridge should be good for about 8 hours and the freezer about 10 hours if you don't fan the doors. Check your owners manual and see if the times are listed.

If the freezer is a chest type, then cover it with blankets to help insulate it. Just be sure and remove them when the power comes back on.

A full freezer will stay colder longer than an empty one. If your freezer is only part full, consider freezing tubs of water in advance (empty ice cream tubs are ideal).

I never thought about having the fridge full. That is a very smart idea though, they would steal the heat from to keep it cold. Water retains heat (or lack there of) much longer than regular air.

You don't give kids the credit they deserve. They can be very smart if you raise them to be. Most parents will limit the amount of TV they can watch to a suitable level, or at least make sure they don't watch it for 10 hours straight.

btw, it's "Swiper, no swiping!", not "no swiping, Swiper" ;)

JRJ
03-16-2008, 10:53 AM
I would lose my tv, internet, phone and computer. Everything else would remain the same, well I would start eating and drinking anything that could spoil but that's no biggie.

It wouldn't be the first time ive went days with the power down and it won't be the last.



-JRJ

Rick
03-16-2008, 10:53 AM
Well. I guess we see who watches the most Dora!:rolleyes:

Your right. I've raised three kids and now I have four grandkids I get to mess up. I was a bit tongue in cheek in the earlier post. Kids remember what they want to remember and forget the rest if it's not convenient to remember. Sort of like you and me.

Rick
03-16-2008, 10:55 AM
Hey, Stony!! Welcome to the forum. Why don't you scoot over to the Introduction section and tell us a little about yourself. Hobbies, outdoor stuff you do, whatever suits your fancy.

Rick
03-16-2008, 11:27 AM
I know it seems intuitive but just in case......

Never use charcoal, gas, or propane heaters indoors (not even in the garage). It can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning.

If your hot water heater is insulated it should stay hot for three days if you use it sparingly. Remember, as you use hot water it is replaced by cold water from the intake line.

If the outage is extended, use a food thermometer to check refrigerated food before you use it. Throw away any food that has a temperature of more than 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Here's a link to a handy guide from the Red Cross:

http://www.redcross.org/static/file_cont3461_lang0_1352.pdf

nell67
03-16-2008, 11:47 AM
I know it seems intuitive but just in case......

Never use charcoal, gas, or propane heaters indoors (not even in the garage). It can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning.

If your hot water heater is insulated it should stay hot for three days if you use it sparingly. Remember, as you use hot water it is replaced by cold water from the intake line.

If the outage is extended, use a food thermometer to check refrigerated food before you use it. Throw away any food that has a temperature of more than 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Here's a link to a handy guide from the Red Cross:

http://www.redcross.org/static/file_cont3461_lang0_1352.pdf

Also,if you are using a kerosene heater in your home/garage any enclosed space really,make sure you have it well ventilated,for the same reason Rick posted.

crashdive123
03-16-2008, 02:00 PM
Also,if you are using a kerosene heater in your home/garage any enclosed space really,make sure you have it well ventilated,for the same reason Rick posted.

Excellent point. Every year I see way too many news stories about people that have died in their homes just from using portable space heaters incorrectly.

GVan
03-17-2008, 01:38 AM
Hey Rick,

As far as Dora is concerned, I have grandchildren, what's your excuse?

Rick
03-17-2008, 08:11 AM
Hey GVan,

Me too! Four aged 6 and under. I'm hip....uh, cool....uh, phat.....wait, I know this one......

nell67
03-17-2008, 08:15 AM
grandpa,Rick,you are grandpa,granparents make the world go round!

GVan
03-17-2008, 03:48 PM
We're from the government, and we're here to help.:eek::eek::eek::eek:

http://americangirlsareeasy.com/photos/area51/02aliens.JPG

Where did you get a picture of my in-laws???:D

crashdive123
03-17-2008, 08:14 PM
At the dinner party.

http://bestbuygeorge.com/shoppingcart/Web/img/tn_aliens115.jpg

GVan
03-18-2008, 03:26 AM
Hey GVan,

Me too! Four aged 6 and under. I'm hip....uh, cool....uh, phat.....wait, I know this one......

I got one up on ya. 5, 2 girls, 3boys, all six and under.

Have you caught yourself just sitting there watching cartoons as though they were there with you?

Rick
03-18-2008, 07:02 AM
Uh, yea. (Can we admit that in public?) Or flip through the channels and stop on Hanna Montana or Rugrats when you're all alone? I know what the house looks like 2 seconds after 4 arrive. I can't imagine with 5!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

AZHomesteaderGal
03-18-2008, 11:06 AM
We are trying to live a simple life, we do have electric though, we have to have it for heater and water well, but we do not drink our tap water (to much sodium) so we always have a bunch of gallons of water & 3 1/2 gallon water bottles full, also we have some round battery opperated lights that stick to the ceiling or walls, and lots of differen't size batteries, as far as cooking we already do alot of grilling outside, we also have propane stoves, no gas out here. Keeping warm would be our main concern, since our heater has an electric blower, but at least it doesn't snow here, so it's not as cold as other places. Hubby and I have been talking about building a one room wood shed outside that we could be a wood stove in and store other things in we would need to stay in if need be for a little bit. We live in a double wide and I wouldn't put a wood stove in it. We have lots of blankets & quilts, also you can put more clothes on. Another way of getting warm is to take a heavy quilt and put it completly over you like a tent and take a tea lite candle, light it inside with you, it wont be long and it will be too warm, blow the candle out and go to sleep. (don't fall asleep until you blow the candle out).
and if the electric is off long enough for the food in the freezer to defrost, cook it all up and can it. If you don't have propane it might be a good thing to always have a couple of bottles of propane handy, you can use propane for most all gas stoves. We have alot of board games, puzzels, bibles & other books to read. You may not like it, but you can do without tv, and pc. Get a radio that uses batteries, so you can listen to the news. Now would be the right time to start learning survival skills, and learning the eddible wild plants, you may not believe it but within a few years we will have to flee our homes into the desert, wilderness or mountains, whichever your closer to.

Rick
03-18-2008, 11:28 AM
That's a good post, AZ. Why are you fleeing? What from?

GVan
03-19-2008, 05:55 PM
i like putting water in my freezer to help keep everything frozen(can anyone say free ice) then it also acts as water storage two birds one stone

always be prepared-prepare all ways

This is one of the things that we're advised to do to prepare for hurricanes. It will only last a couple of days at best.

GVan
03-19-2008, 05:59 PM
:D
Uh, yea. (Can we admit that in public?) Or flip through the channels and stop on Hanna Montana or Rugrats when you're all alone? I know what the house looks like 2 seconds after 4 arrive. I can't imagine with 5!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

When the cousins get together,... I suddenly remember something I had to do outside.:D:D:D They're not really that bad. I seen much worse.

Rick
03-19-2008, 06:28 PM
This is one of the things that we're advised to do to prepare for hurricanes. It will only last a couple of days at best.

I can believe that down there given the heat and humidity. Farther north you can stretch that out a day or so if you don't open the door and/or cover with a blanket for insulation.

crashdive123
03-19-2008, 06:38 PM
With a top loading freezer you will probably get a little more life than a side loading. Won't lose as much cold air when you open the door.

gretagreen
04-02-2008, 07:43 PM
living without electricity sounds exciting. i imagine i would feel a lot close to the earth. :) the only qualm i have would be that it would be harder to contact people for emergencies like fire alarms, ambulances, police etc.

Rick
04-02-2008, 07:47 PM
Why would it be harder?

Tahyo
04-02-2008, 09:26 PM
There's all kinds of things I think I would miss because I take them for granted, but on the same note I have spent years being prepared for most emergencies that would drive most people into panic mode.
My biggest problem would be acclimating my wife to the situation and telling my very ill prepared neighbors, "Sorry, but I don't have any spare (?) for you to have or borrow."

crashdive123
04-02-2008, 09:29 PM
There's all kinds of things I think I would miss because I take them for granted, but on the same note I have spent years being prepared for most emergencies that would drive most people into panic mode.
My biggest problem would be acclimating my wife to the situation and telling my very ill prepared neighbors, "Sorry, but I don't have any spare (?) for you to have or borrow."

Yeah but.......judging from the other thread, they'd smell you cooking in the back yard.:cool::D

Tahyo
04-02-2008, 09:38 PM
True... they'd probably be at my door with pitch forks and hoes.

Rick
04-02-2008, 09:39 PM
I'd be there with knife and fork.......naa. just two hands.:D

Chuck
04-03-2008, 10:03 AM
Our power is a small 12v hybrid system that runs a laptop, some lights, and a modem. If that system goes it won't be a major loss however if the chainsaws all die that would hurt.

Assassin Pilot
04-05-2008, 08:50 PM
Hey GVan,

Me too! Four aged 6 and under. I'm hip....uh, cool....uh, phat.....wait, I know this one......

Smooth. I watch Dora because I'm just that hardcore.

btw, PHAT is an acronym for "Pretty Hot And Tempting" (aka you are too old for being phat :D )

Just stay old-school, it's easier for you old people.

Arkansas_Ranger
04-20-2008, 06:58 PM
What would you do?
Itís going to happen. Sooner or later, the power will go off, and you wonít know when (or if) it will come back on. This doesnít have to be the work of evil-doers, either. It could be a sudden ice storm that brings down the power lines. It could result from other severe weather such as a tornado or hurricane, or from a disruption caused by faulty power company equipment, or even something as simple as a tree branch falling on your own personal segment of the grid, or yes even a SHTF scenario. The effect is the same: everything electrical in your home stops working.
For most modern Americans, the loss of power means the complete loss of normalcy. Their lifestyle is so dependent upon the gridís constancy that they do not know how to function without it. How do you cook a meal if your gas stove has an electric ignition? How do your children find their way to the bathroom at night if the light switches donít work? How do you keep warm if your wood heat is moved through ducts by an electric fan? What do you do with a freezer full of expensive meat? How do you find out what is happening in your area with the TV and radio silent? What will you drink if your water comes from a system dependent on electrical pumps?
So what would you do, or what will you do?
I'm just curious.

A gas range can be lit with a match or lighter.
A gas water heater is handy dandy.
Keep flashlights in the house along with spare batteries as well as candles and oil lanterns.
You lose the meat and claim it on your home owner's policy.
Get a police scanner. It can keep one informed. Keep the batteries charged.
Invest in a generator.
Most pumping stations have generators.
I'll read less in a power outage haha.


The winters here often bring freezing rain and sleet rather than snow. When those occasions arise power lines break like twigs and roads get blocked very often. So to the above...been there, done that...many times. It's fun though.

Rick
04-20-2008, 09:19 PM
you are too old for being phat

What the? How did I miss this? I'll have you know I has hot this very day. Turned the furnace off and opened the front door. As for being tempting. You've never seen my in speedo's so you really don't know now do you?

JRR
04-20-2008, 09:23 PM
We lost a freezer jammed full of blackberries, strawberries, fish, venison, corn, beans, etc. The insurance company didn't give us crap for it. Probably $10,000 worth of food, we made $100 after the $500 deductible.

Rick
04-20-2008, 09:25 PM
That's one of those deals where the wife comes home and finds you in the middle of the garage floor eating your way past the blackberries and heading into the strawberries.

Arkansas_Ranger
04-20-2008, 10:15 PM
Wow really? We had a big power outage once when I was growing up, and State Farm replaced all that food. It was pretty much an honor system - inventory your food and give it a cost kind of thing. Maybe things are different now. So much for working off of precedent.

Sam
04-21-2008, 12:42 AM
What the? How did I miss this? I'll have you know I has hot this very day. Turned the furnace off and opened the front door. As for being tempting. You've never seen my in speedo's so you really don't know now do you?

Ohhhh,,,, MY EYES!!! Must get bacon, to block image. lol

nell67
04-21-2008, 05:43 AM
Ohhhh,,,, MY EYES!!! Must get bacon, to block image. lol

I agree Sam!!!!!!!!!!:eek::eek:

nell67
04-21-2008, 05:53 AM
We lost a freezer jammed full of blackberries, strawberries, fish, venison, corn, beans, etc. The insurance company didn't give us crap for it. Probably $10,000 worth of food, we made $100 after the $500 deductible.


My policy only covers $250 of actual cost of food lost during a power outage.And earthquake insurance automatically included in the policy ,I got the insurance through the company I got the mobile home through,since it it was less than half the cost through another carrier,for the same coverage.

crashdive123
04-21-2008, 07:17 AM
What the? How did I miss this? I'll have you know I has hot this very day. Turned the furnace off and opened the front door. As for being tempting. You've never seen my in speedo's so you really don't know now do you?

:eek:eeeewwwwwwwww!:eek: *runs away screaming like a little girl*

Rick
04-21-2008, 07:57 AM
Actually, it started out as speedos but once it got all sucked up in places it turned into a loin cloth. I wonder if that's why my voice is so high?

crashdive123
04-21-2008, 09:03 AM
I stand by my previous statement.

SGTD00m
04-21-2008, 10:12 AM
Prior to this thread being hijacked about grandparents and speedo's we where talking out going with out electricity.

Over here that happens from time to time however i have found a way around it
http://www.amazon.com/Solaris-USB-Cigs-Foldable-Solar-Panel/dp/B00131UAA0/ref=wl_it_dp?ie=UTF8&coliid=IVK2KPW6KBUGY&colid=MXQ5EV27UHT7
these little thing wont power your house but they will recharge phones, GPS, batteries (AAA, AA, C, D cells), I-pods or anything that charges of off usb. If you couple them with a usb recharger like this
http://www.amazon.com/Solo-3-4-Lithium-Ion-Mini-Storage-Device/dp/B00131OZFQ/ref=wl_it_dp?ie=UTF8&coliid=IQPOTTVWNLWMM&colid=MXQ5EV27UHT7
u can constantly charge from the recharger. It takes about 5 hours of direct light to recharge a phone with just the panels about 2 hours with the usb recharger. Just a handy back up 2 keep the small electronics going.

Rick
04-21-2008, 11:49 AM
About the only thing I care about is the cell phone. I just plug them into their car chargers.

DOGMAN
04-23-2008, 10:49 PM
What would I do without electricity? I'd have a damned good excuse as to why I always miss the toilet in the middle of the night...

BraggSurvivor
04-23-2008, 11:20 PM
What would I do without electricity? I'd have a damned good excuse as to why I always miss the toilet in the middle of the night...

Same reason my wife makes me go off the side deck. :)

Sam
04-23-2008, 11:21 PM
Prior to this thread being hijacked about grandparents and speedo's we where talking out going with out electricity.

Over here that happens from time to time however i have found a way around it
http://www.amazon.com/Solaris-USB-Cigs-Foldable-Solar-Panel/dp/B00131UAA0/ref=wl_it_dp?ie=UTF8&coliid=IVK2KPW6KBUGY&colid=MXQ5EV27UHT7
these little thing wont power your house but they will recharge phones, GPS, batteries (AAA, AA, C, D cells), I-pods or anything that charges of off usb. If you couple them with a usb recharger like this
http://www.amazon.com/Solo-3-4-Lithium-Ion-Mini-Storage-Device/dp/B00131OZFQ/ref=wl_it_dp?ie=UTF8&coliid=IQPOTTVWNLWMM&colid=MXQ5EV27UHT7
u can constantly charge from the recharger. It takes about 5 hours of direct light to recharge a phone with just the panels about 2 hours with the usb recharger. Just a handy back up 2 keep the small electronics going.

Hey Sarge, I found AA USB rechargeable batteries that have the port built in, nice not having extra things to keep up with. The brand is moxia, the site on line is usbcell.com ( I'm not affiliated with these people) I hope this is useful for you and your friends.

crashdive123
04-23-2008, 11:27 PM
Gotta agree with that. My neighbors unfortunatly, did not.....they moved.


Could have sworn that there was a post from Hopeak that said I won't live anywhere that I can't walk out my back door and pee. Don't know where it went. Oh well it's late.

Ridge Wolf
04-23-2008, 11:50 PM
Well, when that happens here, right now... we would be hard pressed to preserve the cold food goods. We wouldn't open the refrigerator or the freezer except as necessary and not for very long. I am working towards getting a generator and specially wiring a separate circuit in the house for it. I don't like those generators that sense when the power goes out and automatically switch on... machines break once in awhile and I just don't trust the automatic mechanism.... we are here most of the time anyway so would be here to switch it over. We would be having steak instead of peanut butter sandwiches like our neighbors.

Heat is to be generated by a wood stove shed outside (also hooked up to the generator) and ducted in to floor ducts that I'll put in. Right now, I rely on Cadet individual room wall heat that I put in some time ago. I am in the midst of remodelling the house at present.. it is taking awhile to do that so am wanting to incorporate some survival self sufficiency upgrades at the same time. I am thinking of solar power for the south facing roof side but that is long future.

Honestly ... right now though it is flash lights and kerosene lanterns and warm blankets.

Rick
04-24-2008, 07:21 AM
Ridge - Most of the auto transfer switches are gravity switches. The utility power lifts the switch and holds it in place. When the utility power fails the switch drops by gravity and the generator kicks on. When utility power is restored it lifts the switch and shuts down the generator. Obviously, that's a simplified explanation. By the way, you can even buy them used.:D

JacobSlattery
04-24-2008, 10:13 AM
What would I do if the electricity went out? Probabaly get drunk and go looting, it's the American way.

Sourdough
04-24-2008, 11:05 AM
What would I do if the electricity went out? O' shoot drunk looters, "It's the American way".

crashdive123
04-24-2008, 05:47 PM
What would I do if the electricity went out? O' shoot drunk looters, "It's the American way".

Good answer.:D

Rick
04-24-2008, 06:41 PM
Oo. Oo. I know. I'd taunt cops to use their tasors. Go 'head. Go on. Try me. ZZZZZZZzzzztttt! Batteries? No one said anything about batteries. ZZZZZZZzzzzztttt!

Cop: Hey, look. He wet himself.

bulrush
05-16-2008, 03:12 PM
We lost a freezer jammed full of blackberries, strawberries, fish, venison, corn, beans, etc. The insurance company didn't give us crap for it. Probably $10,000 worth of food, we made $100 after the $500 deductible.

When we had a power outage, the electric company paid for our spoiled food. We had to submit an itemized list, that totaled $125. They just sent us a check. This might be a Michigan law though. It's not like the electric company advertises this fact.

I also got a 12vdc 6 inch electric fan. If the power goes out in the summer I just grab a 12v battery and hook up the fan.

TBBucs
05-31-2008, 01:35 PM
What would I do without electricity? I'd head to wilderness-survival.net and complain about it!

Oh, wait...

RBB
05-31-2008, 08:19 PM
What would you do?


The first ten years we lived here, we were often without power. It got to be "no big deal."

For long term power loss: Fire up the wood stove for heat, use candles (hundreds on hand) for light, hook up the wood range in the summer kitchen for cooking, clean out the outhouse (for obvious reasons), use the sauna for washing, get the wringer, tubs and washboard out of the top of the garage for laundry.

Biggest problem would be potable water. I think I have a hand pump around somewhere, but it is only a shallow well pump. As long as the reservoir was high enough in the drilled well we could use that - otherwise - we'd have to use water from the lake - which would have to be filtered. We have a number of pump camping filters, and a two gallon bag filter, but the filter needs to be cleaned quite often. Either method would be a pain in the neck, but workable.

Mecklar75
07-21-2008, 02:57 PM
Water is the most important resource someone will need in order to survive after an emergency or disaster. The average person can survive 3 to four days without water. Unfortunately water from lakes and rivers etc. can often be contaminated with chemicals or germs which can make you very ill and possibly die. As Coleridge put it in his Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner, "Water, water, everywhere, nor any drop to drink." His mariner was on the sea, surrounded by water, all of it undrinkable. Sometimes, on land, the situation can be just as dire. Most of the world's deadliest diseases are waterborne. Water can carry parasites, giardia, cryptosporidium, bacteria, algae, viruses & fungi. Diseases like Dysentery, typhus, cholera are all spread by contaminated water and are the causes of more human deaths than virtually any other cause. So as a result it is imperative for you to plan how you are going to provide water in case of an emergency or disaster. It is recommended that you should store a minimum of 1.5 gallons per person per day for a 3 day period. A good way to store this amount of water would be in a 55 gallon drum (http://www.survivalmountain.com/products/water-barrel-package). If you are unable to store water or if you go through your three day supply you will have to find an alternative source of water whether it is a river, lake, or pond. Of course water from anyone of these sources could carry parasites, giardia, cryptosporidium, bacteria, algae, viruses & fungi that can make you very sick if you don’t purify the water before you drink it. There are a couple options one can choose from when purifying water which include boiling, water tablets or water filters.

Option 1: Boiling water – This is generally the safest method to destroy any disease & organisms. In order to boil water you will need a source of heat either from a fire or a camp/emergency stove (I recommend a CampChef (http://www.survivalmountain.com/collections/types?q=Stoves) stove) a camp pot or cup. If the water you locate is murky or cloudy some people like to first pour the water through a coffee filter/paper towel to get rid of any sediment that may be in the water, of course this is optional. Make sure that you bring the water to a rolling boil for a minimum of 60 seconds plus one added minute for each 1000 feet above sea level in order to ensure that all living organisms are dead. If the water taste flat after boiling it may need to be aerated, this can be done by pouring water back and forth between 2 containers.

Option 2: Tablets – This option is the most light weight and portable solution. There are two common types of tablets that are available to purify water Iodine & Chlorine. If the water you locate is murky or cloudy some people like to first pour the water through a coffee filter/paper towel to get rid of any sediment that may be in the water before you add the tablets, of course this is optional.

Iodine Tablets (http://www.survivalmountain.com/products/potable-aqua-water-treatment-tablets) – Iodine will kill pathogens that are heat resistant. When using iodine drop the tablet in the water and wait 30 minutes before drinking the water as per instructions on the bottle. You can also use liquid iodine. If there are no directions on the iodine bottle use 12 drops to the gallon of water. If the water is cloudy, double that quantity. Again, mix well and allow to stand for thirty minutes. Iodine is a quick and easy solution. Pregnant women and people with thyroid problems should contact a physician before taking iodine.

Chlorine Dioxide Tablets (http://www.survivalmountain.com/products/potable-aqua-chlorine-dioxide-tablets) - Like the iodine this is also a light weight and portable solution for water purification. Chlorine Dioxide is a stronger pathogen killer than iodine and will not discolor the water. To use these tablets drop them in your water and wait 15 minutes before drinking as per the instructions on the bottle. The water will have a slight chlorine taste. You can also use liquid bleach found in your home - Liquid Chlorine Bleach: Be sure the bleach you have on hand for this purpose contains only sodium hypochlorite (5.25% solution) with no soap, phosphates, scents, etc. For one gallon of clear water, add 8 drops (1/8 tsp) of bleach. To five gallons of clear water add 32 drops (1/2 tsp.) If the water is cloudy, double these amounts. Use this eye dropper or spoon for nothing else. At the time the bleach is purchased, it should be dated. Bleach which is over a year old has lost about half its strength so the quantities you use would have to be doubled. After adding the bleach to the water, mix well and let stand for thirty minutes before using.

Note: Both chlorine and iodine will impart a taste to the water. Pouring the water from one container to another several times will help dissipate some of that taste by re-oxygenating the water. If you have some Tang or Kool-Aid they will help disguise these tastes for children.

Option 3: Water Filters (http://www.survivalmountain.com/search?q=filter) - Water Filters will remove bacteria, cysts and parasites & filters can remove many waterborne chemicals and even filter out "off" tastes that boiling or tablets cannot. These filters are made in various sizes and output capacities. Some are small enough to be carried in a backpack. It would be advisable to have several of these on hand. Filters are an excellent option when you have the need for something that you can carry and will last long term.

You can find all of these products at

Beo
07-21-2008, 03:10 PM
That's nice now go introduce yourself in the Intorductions section paaaaalease.

crashdive123
07-21-2008, 03:34 PM
I don't know....kind of looks like spam to me.

TrappinGal
07-21-2008, 04:33 PM
i lived in VA in 2003 when irene went through(think it was irene) anyway, we had no power for 9 days. i lived near saluda va.

we came together as a community, for the most part and made it through.

we grilled the meats that were thawing in our freezers and we all ate together.

Black and white and even mexicans all joinin forces and gettin by.

gasoline was near non - existent so we took turns going to the water and ice depots FEMA and the red cross had set up. whoever went would get for the whole community.

then next time someone else went.i was in better shape than some because i had a gas stove while they had electric. we made coffee ect at my house. i still griled with the community.

the first thing i ddi when i moved in was to remove the electric stove and replace it with gas because i have been through extended power outages growing up and knew how vital gas was.

it was a trying time because i was due to deliver Alexys on the 19th of sept, the day the hurricane hit. she held off till the 26th. i was glad of that but that last week was rough, lol.

it was trying and frustrating but i made it through and even made some friends i didnt have before.

Rick
07-21-2008, 07:46 PM
That's good information, Mecklar and I'm sure that you intended to impart wisdom and knowledge to the group. So you won't mind if I deleted your link. If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck then it's generally a duck. Until I know for certain your post isn't spam I'll just leave up there.

If, on the other hand, you have an interest in that web site then I suggest you read and follow the forum rules.

Rick
Super Moderator Emeritus
Science Chancellor to Free Traxistan

Mecklar75
07-23-2008, 01:12 PM
Hi Rick,

Thanks! I wasn't trying to spam just sharing an article I wrote from my blog & store that I thought might be useful.

Mecklar75

Rick
07-23-2008, 01:18 PM
You can put your store URL in your signature but not in the body of a post. The signature actually works out better for you because it will appear on every post you make.

jrock24
07-23-2008, 01:20 PM
I would go camping.

crashdive123
07-23-2008, 01:30 PM
I would go camping.

....or you would BE camping.

HOP
07-26-2008, 08:58 AM
I have family in East Texas and during Katrina the electricity was out for about 2 weeks and my sister lost to large chest freezers of food that could have been prevented with a fairly small generator.
If the electricity went out here in WV the first thing I would do is relax and evaluate the posiability of it being long term or permanet outageand them start using the fresh and frozen produce and converting it to long term storage (canning , smoking and dehydrating) using wood if possiable (renewable fuel source) . I would also try to keep a low profile on these preperations. During Katrina, even hundreds of miles from New Orleans there were wide spread theft and looting . Armed guards on the gas stations.

bulrush
07-28-2008, 10:12 AM
I have family in East Texas and during Katrina the electricity was out for about 2 weeks and my sister lost to large chest freezers of food that could have been prevented with a fairly small generator.


So you pay for $800 worth of gas to save $300 worth of food??

How many gallons of gas do you use in 24 hours for a "small" generator? I'm just curious.

crashdive123
07-28-2008, 11:34 AM
So you pay for $800 worth of gas to save $300 worth of food??

How many gallons of gas do you use in 24 hours for a "small" generator? I'm just curious.

I've got 2 small generators (1800 watts and 7500 watts). When I was without power for an extended period I ran the smaller generator about 3 hours during the day and at night while we slept. Powered the fridge anytime it was on and a couple of fans. We opened the fridge as little as possible, so twice a day kept all of the perishables just fine. Running it that way I would run through about 5 gallons of gas every 3 - days. Once the perishables are gone, I use less.

dukenukum
08-08-2008, 01:14 PM
during the big black out a few years agone we fired up the propane fridge and used the generator for the freezer and oil lamps for light , cooking was done in the outdoor cook area . slept outside under a tarp to keep cool
our neighbor hood pulled together we had cookouts and games , helped each other out when we could , though a few on public assistance had no clue as to what to do we got them squared away and now they are off p.a . and working .

crashdive123
08-08-2008, 01:18 PM
Good deal Duke. Sometimes all it takes is somebody showing them how. Kind of like the teach a man to fish and feed him forever......

Sam
08-08-2008, 01:33 PM
As I read this thread it is refreshing that every post does not start with ' I loaded my ....., and then'. It kinds renews my faith in folks.

Beo
08-08-2008, 03:19 PM
Well since I started this thread I'll give my two pennies worth, If the electricity went out I'd sleep in cause my alarm clock wouldn't work.
Actually got a small generator in case that happens.

crashdive123
08-08-2008, 03:20 PM
You've got a generator just to power an alarm clock?:D

Beo
08-08-2008, 03:34 PM
Yeah! And man is it bright:D

crashdive123
08-08-2008, 03:51 PM
Now that's dedication to getting up on time. Me......not so much. Where's my bacon sandwich?

fitfisherman
08-20-2008, 10:21 AM
I was involved in the blackout of 03. thankfully we had enough gas in my wife's car to get us to northern Michigan. We have some acreage up there with a cabin. Wood heat, propane lights, trout stream 100 feet away and lots of game. The only thing I'm concerned about is getting up there. I live in the city and it was total chaos around here. I wanted to get the hell outta dodge.

I could live forever at my place in the north. The one thing I learned is you have to think sustainable. You can't rely on propane or gas generators because one day that will be gone.

thats the scariest thing to me is being in the city and watching anarchy reign. You have to get out in order to have a chance at surviving any type of disaster situation. These people are nuts around here.

tsitenha
08-20-2008, 02:26 PM
Our hunt camps have no electricity, so we just adapt to whatever we have handy including torches and grilling our food. We would just "camp" at home instead.
Reality we have so many power outages here that we are self reliant without power in all our aspects of day to day life.

Rick
08-20-2008, 05:09 PM
fitfisherman - There have been several posts on "Bug Out" or "Bug In". You might read through some of them and get a different perspective on how to survive in the city (and why you would want to!).

Catfish
08-20-2008, 06:46 PM
A month or two ago, our power company had to take the electricity down for a few hours to perform some major maintenance on a transformer. It affected a fairly large area but they scheduled it for 6am to 11am on a Sunday morning, advised everyone by mail and TV ads, and used those warning signs above the roads. All the local businesses were given flyers so pretty much, everyone knew it was coming.

OK, so 5 hours without power on a Sunday morning in summer. No biggie. I brought in my camping stove, just in case, made sure to keep the fridge door closed as much as possible and...that was it really. I usually surf the web first thing in the morning, but I decided that it would make a pleasant change to sit out in the back yard and read my book.

I was up around 5:30, had my coffee made and was already out of doors before the power went off. But I knew when it happened because on the stroke of 6am, the neighborhood was rent with the sound of portable generators firing up.

It would appear I was the only one who was able to go even a few minutes without electricity. We're not even talking a survival situation here, just a Sunday morning without power. Kind of sad really.

Footnote: So rather than listen to the generators, I went out on my bike instead. At the first hill, I had one of those old-fashioned power outages. :D

Rick
08-20-2008, 06:51 PM
Now that's funny. That would make an interesting Sunday Morning feature for CBS. Ooops. Forgot. No power.

Wouldn't our grandparents have a good laugh at us?

laughing beetle
08-20-2008, 09:14 PM
I was on the road during the rolling blackout in '03, but I was in Central New York when the Labor Day Storm hit in 1998. We were without power for about week. Being summertime heating wasnt a problem. I had access to plenty of ice and coolers so I was able to save most of my freezer contents. I had a Coleman campstove, flashlight, candles and a couple of lanterns. I just read a lot of books and played a few boardgames with family and friends.

fitfisherman
08-21-2008, 08:53 AM
fitfisherman - There have been several posts on "Bug Out" or "Bug In". You might read through some of them and get a different perspective on how to survive in the city (and why you would want to!).

I'll read them but I think I would do much better at my place in the great north woods of Michigan.

Rick
08-21-2008, 08:55 AM
I'm not saying you wouldn't. It's just the act of getting there and all the masses moving in that direction with you. And what happens when you get there and someone is already using it? The threads just offer up some thoughts and ideas about those types of scenarios.

fitfisherman
08-21-2008, 12:08 PM
I'm not saying you wouldn't. It's just the act of getting there and all the masses moving in that direction with you. And what happens when you get there and someone is already using it? The threads just offer up some thoughts and ideas about those types of scenarios.


You got a valid point there.

Can you point me in the direction of those threads?

Rick
08-21-2008, 02:54 PM
A really good post by Vika:

http://www.wilderness-survival.net/forums/showthread.php?t=3144&highlight=surviving+city

http://www.wilderness-survival.net/forums/showthread.php?t=1538

Remy actually had one of the best responses for staying put but it looks like it has been erased. Perhaps he'll post on it here.

Ray
08-25-2008, 11:30 PM
I was on the road during the rolling blackout in '03, but I was in Central New York when the Labor Day Storm hit in 1998. We were without power for about week.

I was on the road, too... just outside of Manhattan during the Blackout of 2003. The traffic was a complete mess, because the traffic lights weren't working. No one could get gas, because the gas pumps wouldn't pump. When I eventually got into Manhattan, the whole island was completely pitch black.

I heard some people got stuck in the subway tunnels inside a train car. No lights and stuck in a subway car with strangers. I can't even begin to imagine what anyone would do in that sort of scenario...

_____
The Survival Hiking Blog
http://www.survivalhiking.com/

canid
08-26-2008, 01:38 AM
in that circumstance ray i would recomend being conservatively friendly. wait a min; that's my usual subway protocol.

Rick
08-26-2008, 06:26 AM
That's why I always carry a micro light in my pocket. I've used that thing soooooo many times.

fitfisherman
08-26-2008, 11:43 AM
A really good post by Vika:

http://www.wilderness-survival.net/forums/showthread.php?t=3144&highlight=surviving+city

http://www.wilderness-survival.net/forums/showthread.php?t=1538

Remy actually had one of the best responses for staying put but it looks like it has been erased. Perhaps he'll post on it here.


good info. Thanks Rick, but I'm still of the opinion to bug out. After seeing the choas and lawlessness during the blackout I think it would be far safer getting to the woods. Case in point Hurricane Katrina, you had all those people looting, shooting, and waiting for the government to come save them. The police were going door to door taking guns away from everyone.

The other thing I noticed is many of these solutions are temporary. In the event of a major disaster we need to think sustainable. Your canned foods and the neighbors canned foods will eventually run out. If I even lived on the fringes of the city I could be convinced into staying depending on the situation. But I live right in the heart of the friggin zoo. LOL

I agree that everyone and their brother will be heading to the hills but if you know many routes to get out of town one would be in good shape.

Rick
09-10-2008, 08:06 AM
Well, I had the opportunity to test this out this week. We lost power overnight Sunday and Monday morning we awoke to a dark house. Egads! I thought, the coffee maker didn't start. No problem. I'll just get me trusty backpacking stove out and make a cup of Joe. Then I'll check the forum and....oh, yea. No power. Bummer.

It doesn't happen very often and I have no idea what the outage was all about. The power came on about 10:30 but it was little more than an inconvenience. Not even that really. Now if the water had been off that would have been a different story. Hopeaks place is a long way to trek just to use the outhouse.....:p

someguy1980
09-20-2008, 07:13 PM
Having just gone through Ike I can say from experience that I did a lot of milling around the house and listening to my priceless Grundig Mini 300 AM/FM/SW Pocket Radio (http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2486269&cp=2032052.2032073&sr=1&parentPage=search&kw=grundig&origkw=grundig&parentPage=family) (excellent battery life BTW).

nell67
09-20-2008, 09:00 PM
Power is still out in places in southern Indiana and Kentucky from the Sunday Winstorm (now dubbed the Hoosier Hurricane)we had as evidenced by the number of people being admitted to the hospital with carbon monoxide poisoning around here,because they either can't or won't read warning labels on generators.

A lady in Louisville died Wednesday night/Thursday morning when her landlord generously loaned her and her family a generator to get them through until their power was restored,and you guessed it,they set it up and ran it inside the house,her husband and 2 year old son are in the hospital,and she is in the morgue.

I have come to the conclusion that not only generators,but also any portable fuel burning space heater should not be sold to JQP,until they have been properly trained and explained the seriousness of their actions if they do not follow the safety warnings on the equipment.

End of rant

Fletcher
09-22-2008, 10:24 AM
sit in silence

trax
09-22-2008, 05:38 PM
sit in silence

....until......

crashdive123
09-22-2008, 06:02 PM
.....the beans kicked in.

ledzeppie
09-24-2008, 02:02 AM
if electricity went out I would simply light up a fire in my fire pit in my back yard just to sit around for warmth (assuming its cold). Then I would use my little MSR whisperlite stove to cook.

In terms of keeping the fridge cold, I would simply go to the store and buy a bag of ice (assuming that its just a normal power outage, not a natural disaster). I would probably eat a lot of canned food and energy bars because I dont have to open the fridge to get to them.

For lighting I would just use flashlights and candles.

for entertainment, i would simply play my guitar or ride my bike, like I always do.

oh, and i would make LOTS of hot chocolate if it was the winter, i would just sit by the fire all day relaxing, drinking some good ol' hot chocolate.

erunkiswldrnssurvival
09-24-2008, 08:59 AM
I have always invisioned myself useing a car generator hooked up to a bicycle so that I could peddle the bike and charge car batteries. If I was to stay put and didnt have to travel, thats what I would attempt to do.

Fletcher
09-24-2008, 01:59 PM
I have always invisioned myself useing a car generator hooked up to a bicycle so that I could peddle the bike and charge car batteries. If I was to stay put and didnt have to travel, thats what I would attempt to do.
I don't think you can peddle the bike fast enough. I've seen a alternator with a 3 1/2 hp and a fan belt setup that worked. But would only recharge batteries. Maybe multiple alternators run off one small 3-5 hp motor would give you plenty power
or one LARGE alt. might work. What are you planning on running?

You are an exstremely interesting fellow! And talented keep the great posts comeing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!

erunkiswldrnssurvival
09-24-2008, 02:38 PM
Just the basic stuff like a lamp, and stuff like that.

nell67
09-24-2008, 02:39 PM
My daughter in laws father hooked up a Geo Metro to his house to power it while the electric was off after the windstorm,not sure how he done it,but he didn't loose anything in his fridge or freezer,had hot water and cooked while everyone around him was in the dark.

erunkiswldrnssurvival
09-24-2008, 02:46 PM
The alt. or gen. from a car can power a lot of stuff if you have batteries thats even better.

buttercup
09-24-2008, 05:41 PM
Nell, we live in southern Indiana. Our electric went off on the Sunday of the storm and didn't come back until mid day on Friday and then it only came on for half the house.... we found out where we were prepared and in good shape and we discovered our problem areas.
It was a good thing since it allowed us to have a practice run as far as what we had arranged in the event of no electric, water, and changing our way of cooking. We had some setbacks over the week with no services but I was proud of how we managed.
I even canned two different days, putting up pears and other food.
Life does go on - we ate well, visited more with each other, and got plenty of sleep since we burned kerosene laterns for a bit after dark and then went to bed.

nell67
09-24-2008, 05:57 PM
Buttercup,I was one of the luckier ones,as the power here came back on much sooner than most of the neighbors,since this house seems to be at the end of the line for one road (two roads intersect in front of the house),and the neighbors to the left of me are on another line,they were without power for several days . Made for some very grumpy neighbors,the second day two of them got into an argument and around midnite one of them got drunk,jumped on his 4 wheeler and ran up and down the road screaming and cussing,trying to get the other one to come out,was very easy to hear with out the a/c on and the windows open,the sheriffs deputy came by and told him to behave and left,half an hour later he was back at it,they still didn't take him in!

Jericho117
09-24-2008, 06:38 PM
Im not shure exactly how this thread is so hot right now, but I would assume most of you guys have propane stoves of some sort. Can't refrigerate food (My spazed out political mother would soon harshly learn the truth), and eventually canned food supplies would run out. Supermarkets would most likely be shut down, and street traffic at a halt because of no street lights and stop lights ( I would assume). I highly doubt an electrical outing would last more than a week (unless it was an EMP attack), but in long-term cases, I have my fresh water creek deep in the forests by my new house ( which I question it's purity, even though I boil it, it runs through a city park miles up, potential contamination) to obtain water. I have thousands of yellow wood sorrel and Cattail near my house, and some wood grouse near the edge of the forests. Cottontail Rabbits are next to my house. I doubt anyone in my area has the ability to capture game without firing a loud gun, and local police called in. To many doubters and fancy people here. I would assume survival in my area quite easy if electricity were out. I would probably flee to the forests to avoid thousands of panic filled people, but I wouldn't abandoned my family.

nell67
09-24-2008, 07:09 PM
Some here are going on a week and a half without power Jericho,And they are not liking it much either,me?? Other than missing out on the forum once my battery for my laptop died,it would not have bothered me too much if I had to wait this long for it to be restored.

I feel sorry for the crews that have came in from out of state to help these people,just to get cussed and screamed at because they didn't get their electric on sooner,there is only so much the poor souls can do and they ran out of wire and transformers and had to wait for those to be shipped in before finishing their job.

buttercup
09-25-2008, 09:34 AM
Nell, like you say, we didn't miss much except the internet. Hate to admit I am getting addicted to this silly thing but whatever . . . we cooked over propane and went to bed early. Life went on. Life is possible without electricty although some people don't realize it. It was easier for us that we had a generator to run the fridg and our two fully stocked freezers. I would have been very unhappy to lose all the hard work that was represented in the freezers - made a decision to can lots more in the future, including meat, so I wasn't so dependent on man made power to preserve my food supply.

Madrox
10-14-2008, 12:46 PM
Great thread! I've invested quite a bit in books and have a decent amount of camping gear to use in time of an emergency. I'm looking at some small solar stuff (portable) to charge aa or c batteries along with small radios, etc. At the house I have a propane BBQ with a (hopefully) pretty full tank so I could cook with that for a while. Also have a small Coleman single burner stove... if it were a full on emergency I would fashion some sort of wood stove from stuff in the garage and burn what was needed. Would definitely read a lot during the day light and get a ton of sleep.

Nomad
11-07-2008, 10:25 PM
What would I do without electricity?? Oh wait, I do without it already. I do charge up my rechargeables when I come to town. Flashlight, razor, laptop. wow, I just realized that's all the electrical things that I own. One thing I do miss is an electric bill.

HOP
11-09-2008, 02:47 PM
I am going to go around the house and turn of everything incase the power comes back on real sudden like.
then I would fal back on whatever I have for backup going real rustic in most things . Solar and wind would be good if I could afford it. Generators need fuel which to my thinking will need to be in place in a large quanity .

backtobasics
11-11-2008, 04:29 PM
I lived without electricity for 2 1/2 years in the Nevada desert, so I would just revert back to what I did then. In the begining we used oil lamps. In a few months we had a few small solar panels. We ran everything 12 volt. It can be an inconvenience, but you do get used to it. The cool thing was hearing about some major power outage on the news. If it wasn't for the news we would have never known it happened because our life was unaffected.

Runs With Beer
11-11-2008, 09:56 PM
I can dig that.

adurbin
11-11-2008, 11:53 PM
Without reading anyone elses posts, and im new at this so go easy

1. Secure all food items to their safe keeping temps, using a cooler or twelve, and if in a snowstorm, use the snow for cold keeping
2. My wife is a Candlemaker by hobby, we have an abundance of candles, lighting wouldnt be an issue.
3. Seal off drafty areas to conserve what heat is left
4. Use an alcohol, or pop can stove to prepare food, or to heat water for bathing, although it really isnt a necessity.
5. Use an alternative method of heat. I.E. Kerosene
6. Wrap fish tanks in blankets to conserve their heat.
7. Dress in layers and use remaining said blankets for warmth otherwise not given by kerosene heaters
8. Take all my wife's spare change in poker games to kill boredom.

Foxman
12-07-2008, 02:48 AM
I'm with braggsurvivor!

BRING IT US GOVERNMENT! AHAHAH!

A190
12-11-2008, 01:00 AM
Consider it like camping only longer and more intense and act accordingly..............

crashdive123
01-02-2009, 11:39 PM
Sarge - Move to General Survival