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View Full Version : How long can you store DIESEL fuel..?????



Sourdough
01-15-2008, 11:29 AM
What breaks down first when diesel fuel is stored for years..???

Does it make a difference as to #1 diesel or #2 diesel storage..???

What factors enhance the storage life. Temprature.? Venting.? Mixing.?

Just the facts: Please......Not you hunch......Thank-you

swampyankee
01-15-2008, 11:50 AM
I don't know how long diesel lasts in storage, but there are stabilizing additives that will prevent gelling and extend the shelf-life of the fuel. Here's a link to one example:

http://www.primrose.com/Premium%20Select/410%20Hi-Flame.pdf

and this is another similar product that we use at work on the marine diesels:

http://www.howeslube.com/products/index.php/category/10

Rick
01-15-2008, 11:58 AM
From Exon.com

How long can I store diesel fuel?
If you keep it clean, cool and dry, diesel fuel can be stored 6 months to 1 year without significant quality degradation. Storage for longer periods can be accomplished through use of periodic filtrations and addition of fuel stabilizers and biocides.

Sourdough
01-15-2008, 02:14 PM
From Exon.com

How long can I store diesel fuel?
If you keep it clean, cool and dry, diesel fuel can be stored 6 months to 1 year without significant quality degradation. Storage for longer periods can be accomplished through use of periodic filtrations and addition of fuel stabilizers and biocides.

Rick, thanks for the help, but.........
I think there is more to this story than the sound bite the refiners release. I have 4 diesel trucks......But I almost never use them. I have two, 1,000 Gal. diesel fuel tanks. I have not bought fuel in 4 years. Most of the diesel fuel is 5 or 6 years old. It is what we call winter fuel or stove oil, so it has little parafin added.

The fuel works fine. I have a water filter on the fuel transfer pump. Two trucks are 7.3 Powerstroke, and one is Duramax 300 hores power, And one multi-fuel military 6 X 6 GMC.

I wonder if the refining is different in Alaska...??? Or maybe because of the cold we don't need biocides.

Rick
01-15-2008, 02:48 PM
That's about my thimble full of knowledge on the subject. Outside of the vehicles the only fuel I store is 5 gallons of gas and 5 gallons of kerosene. Neither last very long around here so I don't have to worry about it.

I assume you have some additive to keep the diesel from jelling in the winter? Or is that the winter fuel you described? I've never heard that term before.

Sourdough
01-15-2008, 04:38 PM
Yes I have additives, however I try not to use it till well below zero. Mostly I use 9-11 it is a anti-jell agent.

The jelling comes from using summer diesel (which has Parafin added to increase the BTU) in the winter. If they really deliver winter diesel, it should "NOT" have parafin added.

Sourdough
01-17-2008, 02:04 PM
There has just got to be more information out there in the world on this subject.

Rick
01-17-2008, 04:09 PM
I looked up one of the few words I know about diesel (cetane, viscosity is the other). Now I'm brain tired. Here's a wiki article.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cetane_number

Here's another article:

http://beta.nwbiofuels.org/engine-performance/

Sourdough
01-17-2008, 04:14 PM
Thank you, a trip to the outhouse at -37* should do wonders for your tired brain......

RealPreppersWearPurple
03-28-2012, 07:50 PM
Awesome. I googled, 'how long can I store diesel fuel for?' And this was thee second listing.
Sourdough, I too have a diesel truck. Do gas companies really sell different diesel in the winter and summer? I've never heard of summer diesel before.

Rick
03-28-2012, 08:12 PM
They sell different gasolines as well. Different ones for elevation, too. There's a whole world of wonders out there.

Wildthang
03-28-2012, 08:15 PM
Sourdough, I have seen diesel that set 5 years burn fairly well. Think about the big diesel backup generators that set around and only start up once per month, and have 500 gallon tanks. That fuel sits for years without getting used but will still run a generator. I have seen old construction equipment that set for 10 years with a full tank, run on that fuel. It didn't run like new, but it ran. Diesel lasts a lot longer than gas when stored because it doesn't collect water like gasoline, it will collect some but a lot less.
I would think that if it was kept sealed, clean, and treated, it would be at least runnable for around 4-5 years.
There are additives that help with long term storage. I would use a biocide, and try to use some of it occasionally, and add some new fuel into it every 2 -3 months. Although nobody will tell you this, it will last a long time. I wouldn't hesitate using 5 year old diesel if it has been sealed, with the right additives in it!

http://www.priproducts.com/


http://www.powerservice.com/cd/

Wildthang
03-28-2012, 08:19 PM
Rick, thanks for the help, but.........
I think there is more to this story than the sound bite the refiners release. I have 4 diesel trucks......But I almost never use them. I have two, 1,000 Gal. diesel fuel tanks. I have not bought fuel in 4 years. Most of the diesel fuel is 5 or 6 years old. It is what we call winter fuel or stove oil, so it has little parafin added.

The fuel works fine. I have a water filter on the fuel transfer pump. Two trucks are 7.3 Powerstroke, and one is Duramax 300 hores power, And one multi-fuel military 6 X 6 GMC.

I wonder if the refining is different in Alaska...??? Or maybe because of the cold we don't need biocides.

Try to burn some and add a little new diesel back in it when you can. Sourdough, if your trucks run on it, it is fine!

RealPreppersWearPurple
03-29-2012, 12:47 AM
They sell different gasolines as well. Different ones for elevation, too. There's a whole world of wonders out there.
Wow. I love this forum. So much information. I have so much to learn. I'm excited
Good info WildThang. I'm looking forward to one day when I can have a 1,000 gallon diesel tank that I pump directly from, rather than having to go to the gas station.

Rick
03-29-2012, 08:19 AM
You'll still have to buy that diesel. You just won't have to go the station. It will come to you.

Wildthang
03-29-2012, 09:34 AM
Another note Sourdough, if it has already gelled, no additive will save it. Water is your worst enemy, so drain it off the bottom of the tank if you have a low point drain as soon as possible. The water is what will break the diesel down over time.
Knowing the diesel is already 5 years old, you better get to burnin that stuff as much as possible this spring and summer.

1 Drain water

2 Add additives

3 Burn all you can

4 Add new diesel when half gone!

Wildthang
03-29-2012, 09:35 AM
You'll still have to buy that diesel. You just won't have to go the station. It will come to you.

Duoh!:smartass:

SARKY
03-29-2012, 11:28 AM
Diesel has a shelf life of 10-12 years if stored properly. The 2 big factors that affect diesel are air and water. Drain the water out of your tank and try to keep the tank seal as much as possible, also keep the tank as full as possible (less air in the tank). Stabilizers work to extend the useful life of the fuel. Fuel oil is for the most part no different than the diesel fuel for your truck. FYI JP-4 or JP-5 (jet plane fuel) can be used as well the big difference is it contains ice inhibitors (not good to have your fuel lines ice up at 25,000 feet)

southard
04-10-2012, 05:35 AM
They sell revelling additives at most truckstops. Its needed especially when you fill up in a warm state and go to a cold one. You'll want to run your trucks to keep the seals from drying out and double check your fuel lines as they break down on the inside, they may look fine on the outside but they can and will seperate in time. There is a product that has come out is a Engine Start Module ultracapacitor. They throw upto 1800 cold cranking amps and work in -40 degree F temps. They recharge fully in 15 min. I'm planning on getting one for the Freightliner. They are supposed to last 15 years.