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LarryB
03-04-2007, 10:57 AM
How about everyone lists two or three of your favorite foods harvested from the wilds? Please confine this list to food that you yourself have not only personally eaten, but that you think is great. ;) Now, If you only like and or harvest say, one wild food even, list it! If you have a dozen of 'em, list two or three only and maybe say why they are your favs, even. :)

I've been eatin' free food from the bush ever since I was knee high to a grasshopper. :D Most of this stuff is pretty good tasting food but I think, after all these years, that my top three wild plants of all time are, Morel Mushrooms, Wild Asperagus and Fiddleheads! Any one of these fine foods gets my tastebuds droolin' and can dress up any meal with taste and color. However, every few years or so, I seem to get lucky and manage to score a few baggies of all three of these wonderful foods in the same spring time period, when conditions are just right. Man, served alongside a big thigh of campfire broiled/roasted chicken, it's food for the God's my friends!

So let's hear from ya'll! Tell us yer favorite wild foods.

P.S. Let's keep it to just foods from the plant family in this thread, o.k.? I can see another thread, similar but NOT including plants, on the horizon...:cool:

Have a good'n!

lb

Bowcatz
03-04-2007, 04:43 PM
Pineneedles (chew needles for vitamin C and tea), yucca flowers, blackberries (eat fruit and make a tea from leaves), henbit (raw or cooked), blanched acorns (prefer white oak, but the orange meat has a nuttier taste after blanching in three hot water baths), bull thistle (raw stem pulp for moisture or roasted root), dandelion leaves, rose hips for tea, violets (flowers and new growth), day lily flowers (leaves used for cordage), wild dill (seasoning), bulb garlic (a perennial transplanted years ago), honeysuckle flowers (vines used for baskets, lowers cholesterol), maypop fruits and tea (very mild sedative) just for starters in free food foraging. I've read that a light syrup can be made from walnut tree sap, but I haven't tried it yet. Suppose to be high in sugar after boiling down like for maple syrup. Sycamore tree can be tapped, too, from what I've read and has less sugar that can cause cramps in folk's stomachs not use to a lot of sugary water. I eat no mushrooms of any kind.

Working on a kind of tap for getting moisture from wild grape vines. The current method of cutting them clean through kills the vine and I don't want to do that anymore. By the way, if you do cut through a wild grape vine to get the moisture, don't put your mouth on the ends of the vine. It is extremely gritty from the sandy particles soaked up by the wild grape vine. Let the moisture drip into a container or your palm for ingesting. Don't let the end of the grape vine get into your container, too. The grit will fall off the end and you are drinking sandy, but clean water. I'd rather tap the grape vine for moisture and then seal the tap hole so the wild grape vine will heal for later use.

I've read that the tops of river cane can be cut off, leaned over, and the drops of purified moisture filtering through the river cane is caught up into a container held under the cut end. I want to experiment with that method, too. I'm always looking for new clean water sources.

I'm working to be very conservative in my hunting/gathering methods. Use, but don't kill anything unless I just have to. Instead of harvesting a dozen fish, just harvest enough for a meal. If I harvest more then I am going to eat that day then I want to practice smoking the meat as a way to preserve the flesh. I want to encourage a "Replace What I Kill" kind of attitude in my heart, too, for the next generation that will follow me to the woods.

I look for grains, too, whose seed isn't black, mottled, or off-colored in the husk. This indicates molds that can kill me or cause some wild LSD type trip. I can find wheat, oats, and grass seeds along the creek bank in late autumn and mid-spring. I guess these seeds have washed down the creek from hunters and farmers planting them for crops and food plots for deer. Later on, I want to plant some cattails on the pond to create a food source that is very handy for food and cordage supply. I planted some peas once and the deer were very appreciative while they ate the entire seedling popping out of the ground.

Oh, and plums. I plant plum seeds, apple seeds, and pear seeds from store bought fruit. A few trees survive from all the seeds I start here in town and transplant out on the property. The ones that live to make fruit are fertilized with fruit fertilizer spikes. Sometimes a really bad ice storm will kill the tree, but that's okay because fruit tree wood is a good wood for smoking meats.

I've been thinking about planting red potato and sweet potato pieces in the loamy soil by the creek, too. The soil drains well, so the potato won't rot if it is a while before I can get to it to harvest. Instead of hauling in store bought foods for a carbohydrate source, I can plant some in the wild to have them waiting for me. Squirrels would be a problem with their constant digging, so I'd have to come up with a way to cover the freshly turned soil and at the same time, let the new shoots come up out of the ground to get sunlight. Probably stack enough fallen tree limbs and such over them to protect them from squirrels and deer, yet let plenty of sunshine through.

I guess I am more the hunter/gather type who farms a little on the side than a true wild woods roamer. I plant crops in remote places (fruit trees, garlic, and such), but can rely on the free foods, if necessary. A portion of the wild foods we eat today were actually brought here by early Americans (both Native and European) and escaped their gardens. I'm starting my own intentionally allowed to escape garden food crops that won't take over a forest or field the way the viney curse called kudzu does. The silver lace vine is another bad outlaw vine that will completely take over an area. My sister planted silver lace decades ago in the backyard and it's a job keeping it culled back along the fence line and out of places it shouldn't be.

thinkfree3
03-05-2007, 01:41 PM
DEER! haha yes, nothing like it. anyway as far as plants go I'd say blackberrys would probably be number one on my list. 2nd would be wild grapes, if you find a good spot you can gather plenty of both in a short amount of time. 3rd.... it's a toss up. depends on what i'm in the mood for, if i just wanna chew on stuff for a bit I might go for some spike rush if i'm hungry i'd prolly go for some cattail

vicki2
03-05-2007, 08:44 PM
We have plenty of fruits around here. Many are from old homesteads where the house is long gone but the berries and fruits aren't. I love wild mushrooms, fiddleheads and all that stuff. Half the fun is going out to get it!

Tangent210
03-06-2007, 12:11 AM
I love berries, here in Oregon there is just about any berry you can imagine and as a little kid I would walk along trails and eat berries until I was full. I can't get enough of them and love jam made from them. I also love duck if that counts hah.

Wolf Creek
03-08-2007, 03:48 PM
I live in a farming community. So grain is everywhere. I like the morel mushrooms alot proably first on foraged stuff. Then my second choice is Mulberries they grow all around here in the wild. I found a few wild grapes around here and blackberries proably be a tie for third. The honeysuckle was my childhood favorite.

the edge
03-26-2007, 06:55 PM
i like berries

woodsey
03-26-2007, 09:44 PM
:rolleyes: fryed dandylions and also morell mushrooms

BSM
04-03-2007, 01:09 AM
Boiled wild asparagus along with fried dandilion heads. Wild swamp potatos and wild carrots (very small, lol). If anyone wants to learn more about wild food and how to find it and cook it, they should read "Stalking the Wild Asparagus" by Euell Gibbons. Great book.
BSM

Sleazy_E
04-06-2007, 04:11 PM
My 3 favorite wild foods that I myself have harvested has got to be
#1 Deer
#2 Mushrooms
#3 Freshwater fish

Keep in mind I grew up in the sticks and hunting and fishing is just a way of life...
While in basic training one of my Drill Seargents had made a comment about never eating mushrooms unless you ahve been to a survial school course... at which point i spoke up and told him that i knew which were safe which were not.... after a short picture quz from him he released the platoon and sent them back to GI the barraks and he asked me where I learned what mushrooms were edible...
The look on the mans face when I told him my mom taught me was pricless.

Chris
04-07-2007, 10:11 AM
He makes a valid point though. There is no test for eating mushrooms and the poisonous ones can have a delayed affect. So if you're not absolutely sure which mushrooms are safe you're better off not gambling no matter how hungry you are. Or, to say it another way, eating mushrooms is for the experts, not the amateurs. He just didn't know you were an expert.

LarryB
04-10-2007, 09:41 PM
:) Excellent! Thanx for all the great replys folks!

I picked my first little batch of wild Winter Cress yesterday, while walking along the edge of a creek, a few miles from my house. My Spring Tonic ingestion, has begun. :)

LB

bear
04-13-2007, 10:22 AM
1. morel mushrooms
2. blackberries
3. fish

owl_girl
04-16-2007, 05:46 PM
Wild strawberries, raspberries and stuffed grape leaves Greek style. :D

wolf
04-21-2007, 12:21 AM
Prickly pear fruit, Shaggy ink cap, Champinon

LarryB
04-28-2007, 10:09 AM
Hey Bear, what would be your third favorite, if you couldn't have fish? ;) I like fish too, but like I said, we'll probably start another thread for that more MEATY stuff soon. :)

Wolf, I like those Shaggy Manes too. Lots of 'em up here in the early fall. Haven't tried the Champs yet though and Prickly Pears don't grow this far north. :(

Yes OwlGirl, I agree, it's hard to beat a well stuffed Wild Grape leaf. I pick a few batches every spring. Right now, up here in Ontario, the Wild Violets are just starting to pop up in some of the spots I forage. I take half leaves and half flowers, opened or just the unopened bud. I eat them raw in Spring salads and dried for winter tea. Whenever I pick (harvest) anything, I am a very selective picker. I only pick a few pieces from any one plant and then it's only the ones that are at their peak in looks and health benefits to my body. No second rate berry or whatever gets in my poke. All those are left for the other creatures, who are not so selective. :) Never, ever, over harvest a wild plant! You are in effect RapeN and Pillaging that species and could even wipe it out with your greedy ways. SO, be selective and thankful and kind in your harvesting methods, fellow wild food eaters. The same plants will come back next year to feed you again if you do. AND, they won't if you don't!

Good replies ya'll, and thanx a heap for your contributions to this thread!

Have a good 'un!

lb

rugby_nut
05-01-2007, 04:33 PM
well i love 2 cook so wen ever im out in da woods my friends or family always make me cook i love 2 use stuff around me lyk herbs nuts berrys escpecally berrys because they r so versitle and can b used 4 drinks food and even cooked 2 serve as a sauce

bear
05-04-2007, 12:00 PM
Hey Bear, what would be your third favorite, if you couldn't have fish? ;) I like fish too, but like I said, we'll probably start another thread for that more MEATY stuff soon. :)

OOPS!!! Sorry LarryB. It looks like I need to pay more attention.:o :confused:

I think my third favorite would be wild asperagus. A few of my friends from work had a cookout the other night. We had crappie,fried wild turkey,morel mushrooms and wild asperagus. I had never had the wild asperagus before but I really liked it. I am going to start looking for it. bear

Go_army2
05-11-2007, 08:25 PM
Frog legs and craw dads!

wildermonkey
05-20-2007, 07:27 PM
black rasberries... lemon balm... garlic mustard

marberry
05-30-2007, 10:54 AM
im absolutially addicted to this one kind of berry i found in northern Saskatchewan , i dono what it is but its the best tasting berry evr , its red but you can see through it, its sort of sweet but has a very unique flavor , the best meats are freshly caught muskrat and beaver tails.

wolf
05-30-2007, 05:53 PM
Wax currants?

owl_girl
05-30-2007, 06:53 PM
what did the plant itself look like?
Streptopus lanceolatus (twistedstalk) ?
http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/pics_s/streptopuslanc_fr.jpg

marberry
05-30-2007, 08:09 PM
no , they were like resberries but you could see through them , they were on a plant that looks sorta like a wild blueberry plant, there was just one cluster of em there iv nevery seen anything like it in books or whyle hiking

Dark786
05-31-2007, 08:02 PM
Nothing like a bowl of boiled plantain mmmmmmmmmmmm.
dandylion root coffe is perfect for a cold winter night
and pigweed porridge

RobertRogers
06-06-2007, 07:26 PM
Cattails, in particular I'd have to say I am addicted to eating cattail shoots (http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/harvesting-cattail-shoots/).

marberry
06-06-2007, 11:48 PM
hmm cattails i neva thought of that lol, ill have 2 try that next time im out sounds good. lol

Tony uk
06-10-2007, 06:09 PM
I like most edible wild berrys, my fav is branbils

sticks65
08-01-2007, 10:58 AM
rose hips you make tea with them and there full of vitamine C.birch sap which rises in march in england.all so i like wild garlic.

trax
08-01-2007, 11:01 AM
Man...caribou steak, moosemeat, muskrat, walleye, perch.. most wildberries--blueberries are number one, I like using wild mint in beverages, kinikinik tea etc., wild onions are awesome.

Sarge47
11-07-2007, 09:51 PM
Okay guys 'n gals, post your recipes right here!

FVR
11-07-2007, 09:57 PM
I'm getting ready for this weekend.

Will be smoke'n some; alot of wild boar, wild turkey, and some deer meat.

I can smell it now.

dilligaf2u2
11-08-2007, 01:17 AM
I have over 300 recipes, i use for outdoors.

Give me an idea for how many and limits! I mean is this just anywhere outdoors or camping or survival? What gear am I allowed to use?

Don

Sarge47
11-08-2007, 01:20 AM
I have over 300 recipes, i use for outdoors.

Give me an idea for how many and limits! I mean is this just anywhere outdoors or camping or survival? What gear am I allowed to use?

Don

I've been trying to move your "Basic Bannock" recipe over here without any luck, sorry. Could you just re-post it here? Also think about the parameters of who would be using your recipes. Keeping things simple is sometimes the best, maybe.

Beo
11-08-2007, 12:15 PM
Sorry Sarge I don't want no She-man cooking for me, maybe a LadyTrapper or Owl, but not a she-man.
Deer Chili (made at home not in the wild)
4 pounds ground deer
20 ounces diced tomatoes
1/2 cup water
1 onion chopped
1 each garlic clove
2 16 once cans of hot chili beans (more if ya want)
2 teaspoons chili powder
2 chopped red peppers
1/2 cup green bell pepper diced
1 tablespoon of Dales Seasoning
1 teaspoon of worechestershire sauce
Throw it all in a pot and cook till boiling hot and serve with a big hunk of home made sweet cornbread and a frosty mug of beer or soda water. Yum Yum :D:D:D

Beo
11-08-2007, 12:39 PM
ELK STEAK by Beo :D
2 lbs. elk round, cut 1-inch thick
6 Tablsp. flour
2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 teaspoon of crushed red pepper
4 medium onions
6 Tablsp. shortening
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup chili sauce
3/4 cup water
1 cup green pepper, chopped
1 can tomato sauce
Combine flour , pepper, crushed red peppers and salt. Pound into both sides of elk round with side of plate or a mallet or the forehead of your youngest child.
Cut into seving-size portions. Peel and slice onions.
Heat skillet. Brown onions lightly.
Remove from skillet and add shortening.
Brown elk steak on both sides.
Place elk steak in greased cake pan with celery, garlic, chili sauce, tomato sauce, green pepper and onions. Pour over steak.
Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 2 hours or untill done.
Or throw on the grill or open fire for a damn good meal :D

Beo
11-08-2007, 12:54 PM
Beowulf's Famous Deer Venison Stew

2 tb Cooking oil
2 lb Deer Venison stew meat
3 lg Onions, coarsely chopped
2 Garlic cloves, crushed
1 tb Worcestershire sauce
1 Bay leaf
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 tb Salt
1 ts Pepper
3 c Water
7 Potatoes, peeled and quartered
1 lb Carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces
1/4 c All-purpose flour
1/4 c Cold water
Bottled browning sauce or liquid smoke, optional

Heat oil in a Dutch oven. Brown deer venison. Add onions, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, bay leaf, oregano, salt and pepper. Simmer, covered, 1-1/2 to 2 hours or until deer venison is tender. Add potatoes and carrots. Continue to cook until vegetables are tender, about 30-45 minutes. Mix flour and water; stir into stew. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Add browning sauce if desired. Remove bay leaf. Get a big bowl and large spoon with a hunk of sweet cornbread and feast out :D:D:D

Beo
11-08-2007, 12:59 PM
Beowulf's Deer venison Steaks with Mushroom Game Sauce

Steaks:
4 Deer venison steaks cut from loin
Juniper berries; ground
2 ts Salt
1/3 c Butter; melted
2 c Wild mushroom game sauce
Sauce:
1 oz Dried boletus edulis
2 c Water
2 oz Fresh onions; chopped
3 tb Butter; melted
3 tb Flour
1 c Rich Deer venison stock; * see note
1/2 c Dry red wine
Salt and pepper; to taste
6 Juniper berries; crushed fine
2 Allspice berries; crushed fine
1 ts Dijon mustard
1/4 ts Paprika
2 oz Dill pickles; diced

Pound the steaks to 1/2-inch thickness. Sprinkle lightly with the juniper berries and salt. Saute the steaks with the butter for about 3 minutes on each side. The Deer venison should be done no more than medium rare. Heat the wild mushroom game sauce, adjust for salt, pour over the steaks, and serve.
Sauce:
Clean mushrooms thoroughly under brisk running water.
Combine the mushrooms and about 2 cups of water in a saucepan, and bring to a boil. Then reduce the heat, and let simmer for 30 minutes. Remove reconstituted mushrooms from broth, and set aside for later addition to sauce. Prepare a roux: Saute the onions in the butter until they are almost traansparent; add the flour, and stir for 1 minute. Add the simmered mushroom extract, strained Deer venison stock, and red wine to the roux mixture, and stir till blended and slightly thickened. Season with salt and pepper. Add juniper berries, allspice, mustard, paprika, reconstituted mushrooms, and dill pickles. Simmer for 5 minutes. Add salt and pepper. The sauce is now ready to use.

Beo
11-08-2007, 01:04 PM
20 to 30 chunks of deer meat
1 long a** stick or several sticks about pencil thin
Open fire

Spit the meat on the sticks and cook over open fire at your camp site
until meat is cooked all the way through (or to your liking) and pull off as you wanna eat. :D
My favorite way to eat it:D:D:D

Sarge47
11-08-2007, 01:49 PM
Guys, gotta go and fix something to eat, ya'all are makin' me hungry!:rolleyes:

trax
11-08-2007, 01:54 PM
We need a recipe thread and Beowulf just needs to publish a cookbook, LOL. Just kidding, bro, definitely keep 'em coming.

Beo
11-08-2007, 02:01 PM
This is a recipe thread, damn canucks... lol... how about a Moose meat recipe... lol
seriously thoug I wanna try some moose meat.

trax
11-08-2007, 02:05 PM
Substituted moose for the deer and elk in your recipes. My all time favorite is to cut thin strips of caribou and fry them up with my eggs for breakfast, doesn't require a recipe. Always with fresh oven baked bannock.

trax
11-08-2007, 02:06 PM
ELK STEAK by Beo :D
2 lbs. elk round, cut 1-inch thick
6 Tablsp. flour
2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 teaspoon of crushed red pepper
4 medium onions
6 Tablsp. shortening
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup chili sauce
3/4 cup water
1 cup green pepper, chopped
1 can tomato sauce
Combine flour , pepper, crushed red peppers and salt. Pound into both sides of elk round with side of plate or a mallet or the forehead of your youngest child.
Cut into seving-size portions. Peel and slice onions.
Heat skillet. Brown onions lightly.
Remove from skillet and add shortening.
Brown elk steak on both sides.
Place elk steak in greased cake pan with celery, garlic, chili sauce, tomato sauce, green pepper and onions. Pour over steak.
Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 2 hours or untill done.
Or throw on the grill or open fire for a damn good meal :D

Or cover in a tin baking dish and bury in the coals of an open fire?

dilligaf2u2
11-08-2007, 02:25 PM
Try this:

Here is a recipe for "Basic Bannock" from the book Trail Food by Alan Kesselheim. It is a bread but made in a skillet.

1/2 C white flour
1/2 C wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
3 tablespoons powdered milk

Add water a little at a time till dough is sticky.
Divide into 4 balls and flatten and heat in a lightly oiled skillet
till done.

I have 12 pages of recipes for bannock.

I have a back pack dutch oven, I constructed from a camping set I have. I bake bread and cake out in the wilds as often as I can. I have also done a pumpkin pie once. Campmore offers a 5 piece Sierra Gook Set that works well for baking. That is for one or two persons. The inner pot is a 3 cup and the oven part is a 6 cup.

If you pre mix at home. Bread is one of the easiest things to make over am open fire or camp stove.

www.MiniBull.com (Tiny) has a video on his sight that you can download. It shows how to bake bread on an alcohol stove. This would work for most any heat source you have.

Don

trax
11-08-2007, 03:14 PM
Roasted rabbit, by Elmer Fudd

1. Kill rabbit
2. Skin and gut rabbit
3. Build fire
4. Poke green stick through dead rabbit.
5. shove end of stick into ground near fire
6.Suspend rabbit on stick over fire, turn occassionally
7. Add salt and pepper to taste
8.Eat Rabbit

trax
11-08-2007, 03:18 PM
by trax

Follow above recipe

A. Gather wild raspberries into a bowl or pail (couple of hands full)
B. Crush raspberries into a mooshy mess
C. Slowly drizzle mooshy berry mess over rabbit while it cooks
D. Substitutes for rabbit include: grouse, ptarmigan, duck, muskrat.
E. Enjoy with bannock from enclosed recipes that you prepared while rabbit is cooking
F. Rabbit should turn slightly crispy on the outside from the berry glaze.
G. Fire should be low and hot, roasting should be done slowly for thoroughness.

trax
11-08-2007, 03:20 PM
I would substitute most wild meats for one another in Beowulf's recipes. Spicing etc is a matter of personal taste. If the reader wishes to follow the Elmer Fudd rabbit recipe but make stew instead, the rabbit should come with his own large carrot, but may be very difficult to kill :D

Beo
11-14-2007, 11:19 AM
Elmer Fudd was the ultimate hunter in small game, just used too light a load. :D

Beo
11-14-2007, 11:30 AM
Also try this recipe in extreme survival situation: Man Meat Roast
One dead partner
cut in chunks
add herbs to your liking
spit on stick over open fire
cook till well done
consume partner
Aghhh gross but a simple extreme recipe :D

Sarge47
11-16-2007, 08:10 AM
Here's a Blog-site my wife sent me that has some dutch oven recipes for any of you that may be interested.

http://marksblackpot.blogspot.com/

MCBushbaby
11-16-2007, 12:43 PM
Chez's Wilderness Soup

Fresh fish (skinned, not filleted; remove head, fins and tail)
Some potatoes (wild or otherwise) or cattail roots (boil these once before adding to soup to remove bitterness)
Onion (wild leek or domestic), season to taste
salt
various herbs

Boil a pot of water and add ingredients. Cook until potatoes are palatable (soft). Fish bones fall apart from the meat when cooked so eat everything but the very bottom pot contents. You can also use your favorite, or available, meat in place of (or in addition to) fish. I'm pretty sure most wilderness soups stem off this basic meat-starch-onion foundation. :D Go nuts

Chez's Plain Baked Potato

This works with any tubor or large root as well.

Throw into hot coals for 20-odd minutes. Poke to see when they're done. Remove from coals, peel away skin/ash/etc and enjoy.

Chez's Awesome Potato

Cut a potato into 3 slices most of the way thru (widthwise). Cut an onion into 1/4" slices and then in half. Place onion slice half into each cut (only two per potato). Spread some butter on potato, wrap in tin foil, through on coals for 45 minutes to an hour.

Nativedude
11-18-2007, 11:17 PM
White Bear's Apple Cherry Chicken

Serves 6

Ingredients:
6 boneless skinless chicken breasts
1 bottle (approx. 32 oz.) Indian Summer cherry juice (100% real juice)
1 bottle (approx. 32 oz.) Indian Summer apple juice ( " " " )
1lb. bing cherries (sliced in half and pits removed.)
2 medium sized Granny Smith (tart) or Northern Spy (way more tart) apples (cored and sliced into rings.)
1 pint heavy cream or heavy whipping cream
2-3 tbls. flour
Canola oil
2 Cloves of Garlic
Sea Salt
Pepper

Preparing:
In a large bowl (large enough to hold all 6 chick. breasts) place the chicken breast in bowl, cover with even amounts of apple and cherry juice and half of the sliced cherries and apple slices. Let marinade over night.

Turn oven on to 350 degrees

Take a skillet over medium heat. Pour enough canola oil to just cover the bottom of the pan, along with two cloves garlic, peeled and smashed . Place chicken breasts in pan, salt & pepper, and brown on both sides.

Once browned, place chicken breasts in an oven roasting pan, add marinade juice, apples, and cherries from bowl to pan. Cover pan and put in the oven. Takes approximately 30 to 40 minutes to bake.

Mix cream with flour (should be the consistency of a thin milkshake.)

Once done, remove chicken breasts from pan. Take 1/2 the juice and put in sauce pan. Place pan over med. low heat. Once juice just begins to bubble, stir in cream and flour mixture. Let bubble, stirring occasionally, so sauce does not get burned or burn to the bottom of the pan. Sause will thicken to a gravy consistency.

Place chicken breast on plate. Cover with a little of the sauce, cooked apple rings, and cherries halves.

ENJOY!! :D


This can be made in a Dutch Oven too!

FVR
11-18-2007, 11:17 PM
Smoked Hog and Salmon.

Take meat, wash, salt, stick in a grill, throw alot of wet hickory on the fire, walk away for an hour.

Hour later, return, pull meat off grill, eat.

Just like the simple ways.

owl_girl
11-24-2007, 02:57 PM
Yes mushroom indeed has nutritional value (thereís a myth that they donít) Here are a couple sites I found that has some good information, I had heard that a good sized portabella potassium then a banana. Still looking for more nutritional info on morals though.
http://www.mushrooms.ca/good/nutrition.aspx
http://www.meadowmushrooms.co.nz/mushroomnutrition.htm

explodingearth
11-24-2007, 03:15 PM
sweet... i love mushrooms in my pasta

Rick
11-24-2007, 03:27 PM
Good stuff, Owl Girl. Thank you. I retract my earlier post on the nutrition part.

I've owned Simon and Schuster's Guide to Mushrooms since the early 80s and pick some in the wild. I don't get very adventurous and stick to the ones I'm really familiar with. The non-gilled varieties. They are excellent anyway you want to fix them. But a can't let the post go by without a note that there are MANY highly toxic mushrooms to be had and many that look very much like their edible cousins. And some that can't be identified unless the entire mushroom is present (the Amanita for one). Learn from someone that knows what they are doing if you are just starting out.

HOP
11-24-2007, 04:05 PM
The site said virtualy no calories ,or fat or sodium how is this nutricious especialy in a survival senerio.

owl_girl
11-24-2007, 04:28 PM
Did you even read this HOP? Its not like I said you could live off mushrooms, I simply stated they have nutritional value. Do you not call this nutrition? It takes more then fat and calories to consider something nutritious, you wouldnít call McDonald's nutritious would you? It's not healthy to live off fat and calories alone. A fat person can still be nutritionally deficient. You need to protect your immune system and organs especially in a long-term survival situation. Your body needs vitamins and minerals, which mushrooms have.

Folate
4% DV (16.0 mcg)
∑ Plays an essential role in building new body cells, by helping to make DNA and RNA.
∑ Works with vitamin B12 to form hemoglobin in red blood cells. Prevents megaloblastic anemia.
∑ The Dietary Reference Intake [DRI] for women of child-bearing age is 400 micrograms. Folate is essential for lowering the risk of neural tube defects such as spina bifida in developing fetuses.
Niacin (Vitamin B3)
18% DV (3.6 mg)
∑ Important for the metabolism of carbohydrate and fatty acids.
∑ Acts as a co-enzyme in many biological reduction and oxidation reactions. Required for energy metabolism.
∑ Helps enzymes function normally.
Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5)
15% DV (1.5 mg)
∑ Acts as a co-enzyme in fatty acid metabolism.
∑ Has numerous other essential roles in energy metabolism.
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)
24% DV (0.4 mg)
∑ Required for the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids, and supports antioxidant protection.(1)
∑ Changes the amino acid tryptophan in food into niacin.
∑ Enzyme essential to all areas of metabolism particularly that of carbohydrate and fatty acids(2).
Thiamin (Vitamin B1)
5% DV (0.1 mg)
∑ Plays essential roles in carbohydrate metabolism and neural function.(3)
Vitamin B6
5% DV (0.1 mg)
∑ Primarily involved in metabolism of amino acids.
∑ Helps produce other body chemicals including insulin, hemoglobin and antibodies that fight infection.
Copper
16% DV (0.3 mg)
∑ Found in all body tissues, with the bulk in the liver, brain, heart and kidney.
∑ An essential micronutrient that plays a role in making hemoglobin.
∑ Also involved in energy production.
Iron
3% DV (0.5 mg)
∑ A component of hemoglobin and myoglobin and is important in oxygen transfer.
∑ A component of numerous enzymes.
∑ About 70% is found in hemoglobin, about 25% is stored in liver, spleen and bone.
Magnesium
2% DV (9.0 mg)
∑ Macronutrient with 50% found in bone and the other 50% almost entirely inside body cells.
∑ Serves as an important part of more than 300 enzymes responsible for regulating many body functions including energy production, making body protein and muscle contraction.
∑ Also helps maintain nerve and muscle cells.
Phosphorus
9% DV (86.0 mg)
∑ A component of every cell and other important compounds including DNA and RNA which are responsible for cell growth and repair.
∑ Part of phospholipids present in every cell membrane in the body.
∑ Is a major component of bones and teeth.
∑ Important for pH regulation.
Potassium
9% DV (318 mg)
∑ Helps regulate fluids and mineral balance in and out of body cells.
∑ Helps maintain blood pressure.
∑ Important for muscle contraction and transmission of nerve impulses.
Selenium
13% DV (9.3 mcg)
∑ Is involved in fat metabolism.
∑ Acts as an antioxidant with vitamin E.
Zinc
3% DV (0.5 mg)
∑ Helps the body use carbohydrate, protein and fat.
∑ A constituent of many enzymes and insulin.
∑ Promotes cell reproduction, tissue growth and repair. Adequate zinc intake is essential for growth.
∑ Involved in immune function.
∑ Also plays many important structural roles as components of proteins.

Sarge47
11-24-2007, 07:13 PM
Yes mushroom indeed has nutritional value (thereís a myth that they donít) Here are a couple sites I found that has some good information, I had heard that a good sized portabella potassium then a banana. Still looking for more nutritional info on morals though.
http://www.mushrooms.ca/good/nutrition.aspx
http://www.meadowmushrooms.co.nz/mushroomnutrition.htm

Dunno if Morels have a lot of nutrician but if I ran across a bunch of them while out in the woods....YUMMIE!!!:rolleyes:

Nativedude
11-24-2007, 09:39 PM
Yes 'shrooms have nutritional value but, if you don't know what you are doing in the woods you shouldn't pick them. There are many poisonous 'shrooms that look like their non-poisonous cousins, but you can die from a poisonous 'shroom. :( Be cautious, VERY CAUTIOUS, when picking wild 'shrooms!! :eek:

Sarge47
11-25-2007, 01:33 AM
Yes 'shrooms have nutritional value but, if you don't know what you are doing in the woods you shouldn't pick them. There are many poisonous 'shrooms that look like their non-poisonous cousins, but you can die from a poisonous 'shroom. :( Be cautious, VERY CAUTIOUS, when picking wild 'shrooms!! :eek:

Dawg you're 100% on the 'shroom danger. Tell you what, you find any Morels and you're not sure send 'em to me and I'll check 'em for ya!:D

HOP
11-25-2007, 08:22 AM
Mushrooms don't just hop into your pan in the bush there would hardly be a very good exchange of calories for energy expent searching for them , a month suplpy of one a day vitamins takes up as much room as one good size mushroom and the healthy effect from mushrooms would not really have a positive impact on short term survival where energy is the prime concern , I under stand many people like mushrooms if nutritional vitamin content was the prime need in a survival a bottle of multies would be all you need . In the wild you don't eat fat you going to die if you spend all your time foraging for mushrooms you die , you may die healthy but you still die.

Chris
11-25-2007, 11:06 AM
HOP makes a point, in a true survival situation you'll probably expend more calories looking for them than they're worth, as such they'd probably be considered a food of opportunity and nothing more. If you find them, great, but finding them shouldn't be your main focus.

Of course in a true survival situation most foods will be foods of opportunity.

SemperParatus
11-25-2007, 12:41 PM
I'd view mushrooms in much the same way I'd view spices. Not so much for nutritional value but rather as an enhancement to make the food taste better.

Still, a news item from several years back comes to mind any time I consider "wild" mushrooms. Seems there was a family camping in Mississippi who decided to add some "wild" mushrooms to their meal. IIRC it was a man and his wife and either one or two very small children. Supposedly the man knew how to identify mushrooms (or thought he did). Several days later they all became ill. Turned out that the mushrooms had done permanent, chronic and irreversible liver damage and they all died from it. For me the risks far outweigh the benefits.
OTOH, as I understand it morels are safe and have no look alikes or even near look alikes that are not safe. I could be wrong about that too.

Sarge47
11-25-2007, 03:50 PM
I'd view mushrooms in much the same way I'd view spices. Not so much for nutritional value but rather as an enhancement to make the food taste better.

Still, a news item from several years back comes to mind any time I consider "wild" mushrooms. Seems there was a family camping in Mississippi who decided to add some "wild" mushrooms to their meal. IIRC it was a man and his wife and either one or two very small children. Supposedly the man knew how to identify mushrooms (or thought he did). Several days later they all became ill. Turned out that the mushrooms had done permanent, chronic and irreversible liver damage and they all died from it. For me the risks far outweigh the benefits.
OTOH, as I understand it morels are safe and have no look alikes or even near look alikes that are not safe. I could be wrong about that too.

There is a "False Morel",:eek: but they're pretty easy to identify. I'm not a regular "mushroom hunter" and don't pick anything but the regular Morels. They don't have a very long life-span. If I was in a "survival" situation during their season and found a bunch without too much difficulty they're on the menu. Otherwise wisdom dictates that I keep over-exertion down to a minnimum.:cool:

MCBushbaby
11-25-2007, 04:29 PM
If I were in a survival situation, I'd not eat mushrooms at all. Risks outweigh benefits, IMO

HOP
11-25-2007, 05:56 PM
I don't know anything about he growth cycle and season but would think that the would not be a constant sorce of food regardless of value I don't find them particular and besides I coulda had a V8.

owl_girl
11-26-2007, 12:42 AM
Mushrooms don't just hop into your pan in the bush there would hardly be a very good exchange of calories for energy expent searching for them , a month suplpy of one a day vitamins takes up as much room as one good size mushroom and the healthy effect from mushrooms would not really have a positive impact on short term survival where energy is the prime concern , I under stand many people like mushrooms if nutritional vitamin content was the prime need in a survival a bottle of multies would be all you need . In the wild you don't eat fat you going to die if you spend all your time foraging for mushrooms you die , you may die healthy but you still die.

Well obviously you are going to die if you donít eat calories and fat, that was never a disagreement. And itís kind of hard to come by vitamin supplements in the woods lol. And not everybody carries them around everywhere. When people are foraging for food in a survival situation they donít normally limit their search for one specific type of food but instead pick as much of whatever they find and if they come across some edible mushrooms while foraging it would be beneficial to include them in their meal. In modern life mushrooms are a very valuable source of nutrition just like apples for example are low in calories and have no fat but people know theyíre nutritious. I wouldnít recommend relying only on mushrooms for vitamins either as your body need a variety. Considering mushrooms as a source of vitamins and minerals only expands your options but there are may other sources to be considered as well. Iím not saying you can live off them but they do have nutritional value.

owl_girl
11-26-2007, 12:43 AM
Thought you guys might find this interesting about milk thistle seeds and the effects it has on treating your liver for mushroom poisoning.

http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/milk-thistle-000266.htm

http://www.vitaminstuff.com/herbs-milk-thistle.html

This info wouldnít make me any less cautious though.
I have picked morels once or twice with a friend but other than that I donít pick wild mushrooms because I donít have that kind of knowledge yet.

Rifleman
11-26-2007, 01:10 AM
Morels are around here. Those would be the only ones I would pick. They can grow in some weird and unlikely places, so I don't think it would be worth looking for them alone. Like someone said it would be a food of opportunity, but I would load up on them if i saw them.

trax
11-26-2007, 04:26 PM
There are still mushrooms out there that I'm interested in more for their esoteric value than their nutritional value....could someone point those ones out to me?

Rick
11-26-2007, 08:30 PM
I could point you to a dictionary to look up esoteric.

HOP
11-26-2007, 09:09 PM
Every post I have seen here and other forums when some one says that mushrooms have little food value thats what they mean and any other values mean little if you don't have food that creates energy. you can put a 180 day suply of viatimins in an 6 or 8 oz bottle and probably should cary some with your bugout supplies fouraging is both a seasonal and geographic isue got to take what you find or bring with you the benifits other than taste of mushrooms is zip.

owl_girl
11-26-2007, 10:08 PM
Every post I have seen here and other forums when some one says that mushrooms have little food value thats what they mean and any other values mean little if you don't have food that creates energy. you can put a 180 day suply of viatimins in an 6 or 8 oz bottle and probably should cary some with your bugout supplies fouraging is both a seasonal and geographic isue got to take what you find or bring with you the benifits other than taste of mushrooms is zip.

Yes you can get nutrients from supplements but what dos that have to do with rather or not mushrooms have nutrients? Why would you go only to forums for that info? If itís a common myth obviously thatís what most of them will say. Go to a site with scientific backup and professionals. You said they said ďmushrooms have little food valueĒ Well I specifically stated ďnutritional valueĒ Iím not debating how much food value/ fat and calories mushrooms have since Iíve always known they donít have much and I have no disagreement about that. I know your body needs fuel for energy but without the proper nutrients it wonít be able to use that fuel efficiently. I can understand saying there are easier to find sources of nutrition but I canít understand saying mushrooms are not nutritious at all.

Questions.
1.Do you think apples have no nutritional value?
2.Do you not believe mushrooms contain Folate, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B6, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Selenium and Zinc?
3.Do you believe the above listed vitamins and minerals are not nutritious?
4.Can you show me a reliable nutrition site (not a forum) where you got your information?

Chris
11-26-2007, 10:32 PM
What vitamins do you really need for survival? Obviously we all want to fight cancer and heart disease, but we're not talking about 80 year survival here, more short term, what is really needed?

Vitamin C can be found in anything green, and of course fruit and berries.

Vitamin D can be gained from sunlight (though mostly in the summer in warmer climes), not really much risk of running low on that if you're stuck outdoors.

I don't know if I've ever really heard of major deficiencies of anything else.

Of course your B vitamins, iron, other minerals, can be gotten from meat.

Sarge47
11-26-2007, 11:19 PM
The Morel is named to mean "Morale"; it raises the morale 'cause it tastes good.:rolleyes: Again, actively searching for these can be a major pain in the butt, so I would have to trip over them to get any.:cool:

owl_girl
11-26-2007, 11:19 PM
Ok so now the question turns to how important are those nutrients not rather mushrooms do or donít have them.

No I wasnít thinking 80 years when I said long-term lol more like 1 or 2.
The functions of those vitamins and minerals are listed and though you could probably do without for a while they are still very beneficial and why go without if you have the opportunity not to? Vitamins do affect your energy level.

Itís a good question. I personally think that vitamins and minerals of many kinds are important for everyday living but thatís just my opinion and Iíd have to do research to get all the information I need to support it. Iím not sure I care enough to bother but if someone wants to debate it Iíd like to see information that supports their statement as well. Fair?

Sarge47
11-26-2007, 11:23 PM
Ok so now the question turns to how important are those nutrients not rather mushrooms do or donít have them.

No I wasnít thinking 80 years when I said long-term lol more like 1 or 2.
The functions of those vitamins and minerals are listed and though you could probably do without for a while they are still very beneficial and why go without if you have the opportunity not to? Vitamins do affect your energy level.

Itís a good question. I personally think that vitamins and minerals of many kinds are impotent for everyday living but thatís just my opinion and Iíd have to do research to get all the information I need to support it. Iím not sure I care enough to bother but if someone wants to debate it Iíd like to see information that supports their statement as well. Fair?

I'm wit' cha Owl Girl. I'm here for "Morel" support! (That's a "play on words", get it? "Morel support"? Well...um..cough, cough.):rolleyes:

owl_girl
11-26-2007, 11:25 PM
lol pretty good

HOP
11-27-2007, 08:36 AM
Owl girl this is a survival forum and not a nutrition forum a but most myths are based in fact and I do offer evidence to support my claim that mushrooms have little food valus it is the same site you posted for the values of mushrooms I think you should have caught that and used a nother example that doesn't shoot its self down. I have never heard mention any where of people stating "you know I like mushroms but they just don't meet my standards for nutrition" you never see them in trail mix or added to pimician and in wildernes aplications are more likely to be used as fire tender than a food source , in survival you ned real value and not Myth Busters ask the real experts if mushrooms are of value for survival I would think that Ron Hood or Christopher Nyerges might give an opinion maybe we can resirect Uel Gibons and get his take on this.
This approach of nutritional value is posabily what got McCandles starved to death while still having a full larder.

Rick
11-27-2007, 08:52 AM
I guess I started this row with my "no nutritional value" comment. I think you are both right. Every food source has some nutritional value. Value for energy expended is really what tips the scale here. If I happen upon Sarge's morels then I'll gather them in a heart beat (sorry, Sarge) but I won't spend time looking for them as my only meal. And all the caution statements stand. If you are a newby, then read this thread for the cautionary statements scattered through it.

owl_girl
11-27-2007, 12:32 PM
Owl girl this is a survival forum and not a nutrition forum a but most myths are based in fact and I do offer evidence to support my claim that mushrooms have little food valus it is the same site you posted for the values of mushrooms


What? My site listed a bunch of nutritional value. True it lists that they donít have fat or many calories but I already told you there is no disagreement on that so why are you debating it? Hop Iím not even sure what you are debating. Are you debating what mushrooms contain? Or the importance of what mushrooms contain? Those are two separate topics.

trax
11-27-2007, 12:42 PM
I could point you to a dictionary to look up esoteric.

esoteric: "of a philosophical doctrine or the like--intended to be revealed only to initiates of a group" see also; arcane, cryptic, enigmatic

Psychotropic: affecting mental activity, behavior or perception


Point at that, Ricky. There are certain cacti out there that I might find particularly interesting as well, usually consumed by initiates of a specific group.

owl_girl
11-27-2007, 12:44 PM
esoteric: "of a philosophical doctrine or the like--intended to be revealed only to initiates of a group" see also; arcane, cryptic, enigmatic

Psychotropic: affecting mental activity, behavior or perception


Point at that, Ricky. There are certain cacti out there that I might find particularly interesting as well, usually consumed by initiates of a specific group.

So you are looking for magic mushroom lol.

Rick
11-27-2007, 12:47 PM
I thought psychotropic had to do with the tropics. You know, tropics, sub-tropics, psychotropics. I'm all for that affecting mental activity, though. Anything that improves my behavior or perception would be a good thing. I do take a pill to help with my memory but I just take half a pill 'cause there are some things I'd sooner forget. :O)

trax
11-27-2007, 12:51 PM
So you are looking for magic mushroom lol.

Actually, I only meant it as a wee bit of humor, anyone stumbling around out in the bush on magic mushrooms or peyote I sincerely hope is unarmed and well-monitored by friends.

HOP
11-27-2007, 03:10 PM
one of the more common defenictions of nutrition is food and that is the most common use for describing items you can eat in a survival discussion and in these ordinary comon context it is true that mushrooms have little nutritional value, what are you going to do increase your field guides with extra semi usless information or carry around a spectography machine to analize every thing. I wonder if the information is even about wild mushrooms or most likely it is about the ones that are kept in the dark and fed lots of furtilizer.

Rick
11-27-2007, 03:17 PM
I'm gonna go get a mirror. I may resemble that.

owl_girl
11-27-2007, 05:38 PM
one of the more common defenictions of nutrition is food and that is the most common use for describing items you can eat in a survival discussion and in these ordinary comon context it is true that mushrooms have little nutritional value

To me thatís still like saying apples have very little nutritional value considering they donít have fat or much for calories but yet I hear people say all the time that apples are nutritious.

trax
11-27-2007, 05:43 PM
keeps the doctor away. In fact, in can put the doctor right out cold is your aim is good enough with the apple.

nell67
11-27-2007, 05:47 PM
keeps the doctor away. In fact, in can put the doctor right out cold is your aim is good enough with the apple.

LMAO That was hilarious!Hope there are no doctors on the forum LOL!

owl_girl
11-27-2007, 05:49 PM
I have never heard someone say McDonald's is nutritious despite the fact that it is loaded with fat and calories. Thatís why I believe people are often (though not always) talking about vitamins and minerals when they say nutritious.

trax
11-27-2007, 05:49 PM
Pardon my typos on that last one...whoa....

HOP
11-28-2007, 08:35 AM
Owl girl have you even ever ben in a McDonalds they have salads milk and other healthy meals as well and yes even the worthles mushroom is there. I was lost in the wildernes the other and looked down and there was some mushrooms and then I looked up and there was a McDonald which one was chosen? Apples are loaded with sugar wich is quickly converted to energy. So now we are comparing apples to mushrooms a resonable person giving the choice that they needed the energy in order to not perish would choose the apple if we are in to kitchen choose what we want but when in a down and dirty survival you beter make the right choice mickey Ds doesn't stay open late in the woods. It would not suprise me that the nutrition info you refer to is published by the mushroom growers who just want your money. there are probably more minerals in dirt, ditamasious earth is some healthy stuf but it taste like dirt.

Rick
11-28-2007, 08:44 AM
Sorry, Hop. The saying is, "Comparing apples to oranges" not "Apples to mushrooms". Now, if I stumbled across an orange in the wild, I'd pick that unless it was an orange mushroom. I'd pass that by. Not much fat on an orange mushroom.

HOP
11-28-2007, 10:24 AM
How about mushrooms to a big fat rabit, trout , squirel or deer or Wendys and don't try to tell me that little red headed girl would serve any thing with out the I am going to make it out of here deffinition of food.

SemperParatus
11-28-2007, 11:57 AM
I know that I'm going to regret making this post but I can't stop myself. Can I plead insanity up front?

It's hard to bring a disagreement to a conclusion when both sides have some degree of right in their argument. Given that there is some nutrition to be found in some mushrooms and also given that there are usually better choices to be made for diet, safety becomes the deciding factor for me. I'm sure that there are experts out there who can identify all mushrooms at all times without error but I ain't one of them. Now, if a mistake was going to make me a little sick and I'd get over it that would be one thing but that's not how it is with mushrooms. Mistakes with mushrooms kill and it's not like you just go to sleep and don't wake up. The poison in mushrooms attack your liver. That is one of the worst ways to go. It's all about survival and for me that means that I just don't take that risk.

Beo
11-28-2007, 12:03 PM
Don't do shrooms, to me mushroms are a fungus and I don't eat fungus... plus just don't like them. More plants in the forest, woods, mountains, or river bottoms to eat then a frig'n fungus. But then again I don't frig'n frogs either :D

Rick
11-28-2007, 12:19 PM
You're right, Semper. Ain't gonna work. I tried the same thing back about post #28 and we're now at....what?....46? They stepped on me like one of Beo's frig'n fungi and kept on walkin'. Spore juice on the sole of their boots, that's all I was. I didn't stand a chance. You won't, either.

Sarge47
11-28-2007, 01:08 PM
OK, I agree that all mushrooms are bad! So anybody finding or hanging onto any Morels, send them to me for immeadiate disposal. It's the least I can do for my fellow Wolves.:rolleyes:

nell67
11-28-2007, 01:09 PM
OK, I agree that all mushrooms are bad! So anybody finding or hanging onto any Morels, send them to me for immeadiate disposal. It's the least I can do for my fellow Wolves.:rolleyes:
haha Sarge you tell them,BTW I'll help you dispose of them!

trax
11-28-2007, 01:13 PM
But that man's willingness to sacrifice himself for the wolf-pack..well....give me a minute I have to catch my breath. God bless you Sarge, God bless you.

Beo
11-28-2007, 01:14 PM
If everyone would just agree with me it would be a great world.
Beowulf for President!!!!!!!!! :D Trax for Vice Pre, Sarge as Moderator :D CIA ran by Eplodingearth so he can get files on some people, Nell-Owl Girl-Lady Trapper to Supreme Court, Chris as National Security Advisor, and this WILL BE a dictatorship!!! :D And no shroom eating or frog licking!!!

trax
11-28-2007, 01:16 PM
Bro, if you're the prez it'll be a Dick-tatorship, LMAOOOOOOOOOO

Beo
11-28-2007, 01:18 PM
In Beowulfifstan (the new name for the U.S.) it's my way or the highway. :D
Next we take Canada :D

trax
11-28-2007, 01:24 PM
In Beowulfifstan (the new name for the U.S.) it's my way or the highway. :D
Next we take Canada :D

Tell you what, save yourself a lot of bloodshed, I'll sell it to you for a stack of blankets, a few rifles, steel axes and some pretty shiny beads....no wait, that's been done already...never mind.

Beo
11-28-2007, 01:27 PM
I know one thing I'd get rid of the reservations. Give the Native Americans the States of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Minnasota, North & South Dakota, Montana, and Kansas and all that goes with them to run as they see fit. Some of the Eastern States also. But that's a whole new issue :D

trax
11-28-2007, 01:27 PM
See...in Traxistan (still easier to spell) I'll just set my self up as President, Supreme Commander, Emissary of God, and Generalissimo Grande for Life.You'll all get good jobs. No power tripping here dude, I promise to take good care of all the people. If you call the Presidential Palace and get the machine...me and Nell are out mushroom picking....

Beo
11-28-2007, 01:29 PM
Or frog licking :D

trax
11-28-2007, 01:35 PM
hmmm, nope, no frogs in Traxistan Pretty sure they'd all be devoured by my southern neighbors, Beowulfistanians

Rick
11-28-2007, 01:54 PM
You guys realize, don't you, that you've probably tripped every computer in the NSC and CIA? All this talk of overthowin' the government. Anarchy and such. (Note to Feds. I had no part, nor do I sanction any form of revolution) but I'll be happy to be a character witness for both of you. God knows you're both characters.

trax
11-28-2007, 01:57 PM
Just doin' my patriotic bit, Rick.:D

Rick
11-28-2007, 02:04 PM
Oh, sure. You'll be singin' O' Canada while they cart poor Beo off.

Beo - You gotta stick with your own pack. You're gonna get in trouble playin' in the next valley like that.

trax
11-28-2007, 03:11 PM
i quit singing O Canada after they changed the words to accomodate the guy that sang it Montreal's hockey games.

And partner, if anyone's carting Beo off while I'm standing there...they best figure on having a little tussle on their hands.

I try to be about as A-political as a person can be ( I don't believe any of them) but I do believe that people shouldn't fear their governments, governments should fear the people.

As far as my southern neighbors..well back in the '70's I used to wear a t-shirt that said "Willie Nelson for President" Everyone that read it thought it was funny, I thought it was a good idea, LOL.

trax
11-28-2007, 03:23 PM
i didnt break the "no politics" rule, that's all I've got to say about that and I don't want to discuss politics.

Beo...you gave back Montana twice bro...

owl_girl
11-28-2007, 03:41 PM
Owl girl have you even ever ben in a McDonalds they have salads milk and other healthy meals as well and yes even the worthles mushroom is there. I was lost in the wildernes the other and looked down and there was some mushrooms and then I looked up and there was a McDonald which one was chosen? Apples are loaded with sugar wich is quickly converted to energy. So now we are comparing apples to mushrooms a resonable person giving the choice that they needed the energy in order to not perish would choose the apple if we are in to kitchen choose what we want but when in a down and dirty survival you beter make the right choice mickey Ds doesn't stay open late in the woods. It would not suprise me that the nutrition info you refer to is published by the mushroom growers who just want your money. there are probably more minerals in dirt, ditamasious earth is some healthy stuf but it taste like dirt.

Yes Iíve been to McDonalds and it sucks. Their salads are made with iceberg lettuce (which is like one of the lowest quality lettuce) and isnít nearly as nutritious as romaine lettuce but iceberg is cheaper so thatís what they use.

There is more there one debate going on between you and me hop, and you keep entangling them. One debate is our disagreement on the definition of nutrition. My point with the apples and McDonalds was not to debate rather or not they were a better food source then mushrooms. It was explaining why I came to the conclusion that people are often speaking of vitamins and minerals when they say something is nutritious. I donít think it was apples sugar content that inspired the saying an apple a day keeps the doctor away. My point was that people consider apples nutritious despite the lack of fat and calories. There are many things that contain fat calories and sugar that people donít consider nutritious.

Also I stated multiple times that I was not implying you could live off mushrooms or that you donít need fat and calories in your diet (there has never been a disagreement there) I understand the importance of fat and calories in your diet especially in a survival situation. But yet you keep using it as if I was implying that getting the nutrients in mushrooms was more important in a survival situation then getting fat and calories, and I was not implying that at all. What I was saying was only that if you eat them (non poisonous ones) you are adding vitamins and minerals to your body. I understand that is not fuel but it is a form of nourishment and benefits your body.

I donít understand your point about dirt having nutrients since I already stated I was aware that there are other sources nutrients and there being other sources of nutrients dos not make the mushroom any less nutritious. I donít see the logic in saying mushrooms have no nutritional value because you can get nutrition ells where. My point wasnít that mushrooms are a better source of nutrition the others. My point was simply to broaden the options. You wouldnít say rosehips are worthless because you can get vitamin C from pine needles, its just another option.

And those of you who are worried about poisonous mushrooms, I can respect that. I wouldnít recommend picking mushrooms if you arenít certain about the identification.

nell67
11-28-2007, 04:36 PM
Bro, if you're the prez it'll be a Dick-tatorship, LMAOOOOOOOOOO
LMAO!!!!:D

trax
11-28-2007, 05:56 PM
I thought you just gave a very clear, succinct and reasonable explanation of your point of view.

owl_girl
11-28-2007, 06:55 PM
Thanks trax :).

Beo
11-28-2007, 07:27 PM
I... uh... yeah what Trax said. Nice write Owl Girl. And Trax I got your back if'n someone tries to mess with ya, fact I'll get in front and they gotta go through me first. And Rick... hmmm... my valley ain't go no boarders bro, North America is one big land in these eyes, Fed's... screw'em come get me I got something for ya :D

HOP
11-28-2007, 07:37 PM
Letuce. lettuce there is another non food item it is listed as a free food on most diets. Apples are actually a good food source with plenty of calories. Why is it that some people come to the defence of non issue subject ask an Inuet if fat is good for you (they know they wil die without it) I realize that we talk about a lot of things here but mostly how they apply to survival it is what we do. on this site when some one talks about food we think survival rations and what is the most energy for the least expenditure of energy and I think most look at it like this. The most common way to to refer to the food value of something is to say nutritional but in most survival cases it is really caloric value that is being refered to. It is not that some where that vitamins and minerals don't come into the picture but mostly in a theraputic way for illness. To be objective fat is pretty hard to come by in the wild so we need large amounts of proteen and carbs(if you can find them) when you are in a bad spot and ain't geting home easy if at all nutrition takes on a different meaning. Letece full of H2O

owl_girl
11-28-2007, 08:47 PM
Then why were you using salad as a health food example for McDonaldís?

The average sized apple has around 75 calories and you use most of that digesting it and I still donít think thatís why people say an apple a dayÖya know


ask an Inuet if fat is good for you (they know they wil die without it)

I already told that I donít disagree that people need fat in their diet especially in a survival situation but there you go debating it again. Who are you debating it with? Listen carefully I donít disagree that people need fat and calories in their diet especially in a survival situation so why do you keep stating it?

Sarge47
11-28-2007, 08:50 PM
Right, like none of you guys would NOT go into the woods with Owl Girl to help her look for mushrooms, nutrients or not! Gimmie a break!:rolleyes:

owl_girl
11-28-2007, 09:00 PM
I donít want to go alone into those deep dark woods ;)

HOP
11-28-2007, 09:02 PM
you haven't eaten in a week and you got to choose I good size mushroom of an simi familar type and a big double cheese burger which one gets turned into fertalizer before you have to hike twenty miles to the road.

Rick
11-28-2007, 09:05 PM
(fingers in ears) I can't hear you. I can't hear you. I can't hear you. Salacious. Salacious. Salacious.

Sarge47
11-28-2007, 09:05 PM
you haven't eaten in a week and you got to choose I good size mushroom of an simi familar type and a big double cheese burger which one gets turned into fertalizer before you have to hike twenty miles to the road.

Owl Girl, you & I are going "mushroom" hunting; HOP can go looking for the "Big Mac"!:rolleyes:

owl_girl
11-28-2007, 09:13 PM
you haven't eaten in a week and you got to choose I good size mushroom of an simi familar type and a big double cheese burger which one gets turned into fertalizer before you have to hike twenty miles to the road.
I repeat My point with the apples and McDonalds was not to debate rather or not they were a better food source then mushrooms. It was explaining why I came to the conclusion that people are often speaking of vitamins and minerals when they say something is nutritious.

Did I ever say mushrooms were a better food source then a cheeseburger? NO. There are many better food sources then mushrooms. Did my thread say mushrooms the best food source in the world? NO. Did my thread say mushrooms the best food source in the woods? NO. I much rather have a Greek gyro but letís be realistic gyros and cheeseburger donít grow in the woods.

HOP
11-28-2007, 09:22 PM
I think we ned to get the USDA and the FDA involved to se if this aledged nutricious mushroom even mets minimun requirement standards to be labeled legaly as nutritricous. I f it doesn't met standards it goes in the nonfood bin.

Sarge47
11-28-2007, 09:23 PM
I much rather have a Greek gyro but letís be realistic gyros and cheeseburger donít grow in the woods.

And...and...Curley Fries don't grow wild neither! (sorry Nell.) Actually, I didn't know they made "Curley" Fries, How about "Moe" Fries, Or "Larry Fries", or "Shemp Fries?" (n'yuk n'yuk):rolleyes:

owl_girl
11-28-2007, 09:29 PM
Come on hop you know you wont to help me look for mushrooms lol. Stop being stubborn.

Rick
11-28-2007, 09:42 PM
What we have here is an ambitious factitious judicious (albeit nutritious) a wee bit malicious, somewhat vicious, perhaps superstitious (it makes me suspicious) but always delicious thread.

Oh, Sarge. You sleigh me (little Christmas pun).

wareagle69
11-28-2007, 09:53 PM
if i am in the woods i will eat mushrooms if any of you posers take the time to educate yourselves about wilderness survival you will learn quickly about five or six mushrooms that are easily identifiable and will help keep you alive food in the stomach will give you energy to keep going. honestly some of you need to get in some dirt time and educate yourselves.

always be prepared..

Sarge47
11-28-2007, 10:05 PM
if i am in the woods i will eat mushrooms if any of you posers take the time to educate yourselves about wilderness survival you will learn quickly about five or six mushrooms that are easily identifiable and will help keep you alive food in the stomach will give you energy to keep going. honestly some of you need to get in some dirt time and educate yourselves.

always be prepared..
So does this mean I can get 'shrooms on my Big Mac WITHOUT having to clear it with with the USDA, the FDA, The ASPCA, The ACLU, The CIA, The FBI, and any other intials I can come up with? (Sorry WE, couldn't resist):rolleyes:

SemperParatus
11-29-2007, 12:55 AM
Yeah, what he said!!!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:
Originally Posted by wareagle69
if i am in the woods i will eat mushrooms if any of you posers take the time to educate yourselves about wilderness survival you will learn quickly about five or six mushrooms that are easily identifiable and will help keep you alive food in the stomach will give you energy to keep going. honestly some of you need to get in some dirt time and educate yourselves.

always be prepared..

So does this mean I can get 'shrooms on my Big Mac WITHOUT having to clear it with with the USDA, the FDA, The ASPCA, The ACLU, The CIA, The FBI, and any other intials I can come up with? (Sorry WE, couldn't resist)
__________________
SARGE
Ya gotta love the Wolf Pack!

I'm sensitive to name calling ("posers"). I don't do it and I won't tolerate it. The real kicker is the "super moderator" chiming in in agreement. I've been received in this forum cooly at best. I've put out the effort to try to be helpful to the possible newbies who may be unaware of the dangers of the mushrooms they're being encouraged to eat. I was respectful in my approach. Rick was sure right about the getting walked on for it. Think I'll take my toys and find a new sandbox to play in.

Sarge47
11-29-2007, 01:16 AM
I'm sensitive to name calling ("posers"). I don't do it and I won't tolerate it. The real kicker is the "super moderator" chiming in in agreement. I've been received in this forum cooly at best. I've put out the effort to try to be helpful to the possible newbies who may be unaware of the dangers of the mushrooms they're being encouraged to eat. I was respectful in my approach. Rick was sure right about the getting walked on for it. Think I'll take my toys and find a new sandbox to play in.

This group gets a bit frisky at times. Wareagle, like several others here speaks the way he feels. You can take it or leave it and you seem to be doing the latter. I was just joshing because of the "Owl Girl vs. Hop debate." In my opinion your waaaay too sensitive if the opinions of two people offended you. And for the record, being a moderator doesn't change anything I might want to say. If you're that easily offended then perhaps you're correct in leaving, although I think you're over-reacting. So long.:cool:

owl_girl
11-29-2007, 02:28 AM
I'm sensitive to name calling ("posers"). I don't do it and I won't tolerate it. The real kicker is the "super moderator" chiming in in agreement. I've been received in this forum cooly at best. I've put out the effort to try to be helpful to the possible newbies who may be unaware of the dangers of the mushrooms they're being encouraged to eat. I was respectful in my approach. Rick was sure right about the getting walked on for it. Think I'll take my toys and find a new sandbox to play in.

I donít have a problem with you or anyone advising caution. You are right to do so. I certainly donít remember stepping on anyone for it, though I may not have said much in response because I was a bit focused on debating with hop. Donít take it so seriously when one person gets ďfriskyĒ as Sarge puts it. Itís not as if the whole group jumped on you. Indeed your posts are valuable and there are many people on this forum that will have many different reactions to them, sometimes you just gotta let things roll off your back. Just because one person doesnít like your post doesnít mean others wonít find it helpful.

Rick
11-29-2007, 07:29 AM
Sempar - Please understand that my statement (getting walked on) was purely tongue in cheek as are a good many of mine. Most of the folks on here are good to the bone and engage in lively banter but never at someone else's cost. I'm really new to the forum having joined this month and have been welcomed by all and usually through some spirited conversation of which I take no offense.

I don't see the reference to "posers" being aimed at you or being said in a malicious manner. To be frank, I glossed over it without a second thought.

Please take a look at your signature:

"It's not what a man holds in his hand so much as what he holds in his heart and in his mind."

Those are good words and I would suggest you may have take offense where none was intended.

In the end, I would hate to see you leave the group but you have to do what makes you comfortable and is right for you.

As for the moderator reference, I also maintain a forum elsewhere in the net world and, from my perspective, didn't see anything from Sarge that would have raised my ears had it occurred on my site. Again, just my opinion.

HOP
11-29-2007, 08:24 AM
Wareagle , owlgirl has been so kind as to p[ost the values of the mushroom and while it shows some vitamins and minerals it has litle protien. fat or carbos which IMHO makes it a very poor choice as a forage item in a survival not to mention that it is seasonal at best. The conversation that is going on is what nutritional means is it a myth that mushrooms are not concidered a good source for nutrition in a survival sort of way.

Sarge Semper is IMHO a serious student and practicioner of prepardness and survival and on other sites he has put in a lot of hard work and study to put forth diferent web sites of information that we all seam to want to know and is an ace at it. His behavioron this site is probably a lot closer to the forum rules than any of us including your self, we don't have to read every post if we don't want to and can only speak our likes and dislikes for our selfs and Semper is right don't get mad just moderate don't take sides that is part of the job description.

I think the next subject in this series should be are rabbits nutritious ( I was going to say owls but stopped myself) I have read in an old time trapping book where owl was deleious but you have to get over that shined out it looked like a human baby.

HOP
11-29-2007, 08:29 AM
Come on hop you know you wont to help me look for mushrooms lol. Stop being stubborn.

Owl girl I would not hesitate to go on a trek with you I am sure you would pull your weight and your knowledge would be a real asset and you get to carry the nutrition identifier book set in your ruck.

Beo
11-29-2007, 08:36 AM
WarEagle69 "posers" you say we're posers cause we joke around on here bout mushrooms... come on bro, this is an internet forum relax. If you're here posting you're obviously not "out getting dirt time" but to call us posers over a thread and you don't know us other than what's on here. Well I am not a poser, but then again how would you know that right? Well the same way I trust what you say even though I don't really know if your living off the grid in a homestead. How do I know you ain't lying? Its just a thread, now while I know I can handle my own in the wilderness and have nothing to prove to anyone here, how do we know ANYONE here really does what they say they do, simple fact we take there word for it. So, bro, relax. Now I know I can forage in the woods and find plenty to eat... but I also know I'm not up to snuff on which mushrooms are good and which ain't, personally I don't care cause there is plenty to eat in a forest. BUT I like having WE back cause I know when we get waaaaay off track he'll bring us back. :D And Semperfartus :D the name calling on here is in fun... dude ya can't handle name calling on the forum how you gonna handle it in a survival situation? I don't care how many sites anyone has posted on or studied at, I'm going to be me and if'n it ain't good enough then tuff sh*t, I study my survival skills and practice them in the forests, was trained by the military and etc... so what... Relax people.
Owl Girl as for you.... darling anytime ya wanna go into the forest and look for shrooms and study them you just let me know girl cause I'll go :D

Beo
11-29-2007, 08:54 AM
Wheeeee... thanks for letting me vent :D

Chris
11-29-2007, 11:35 AM
People get riled up about the simplest things.

I think everyone can agree on these two things:

1. In a true survival situation mushrooms should be foods of opportunity only. When you need calories your time is better spent setting traps or foraging more in general rather than looking for any 1 specific food. (same goes for alot of things).

2. You should never eat a mushroom if you are at all unsure if it is safe or not. There is no test for edibility you can use with a mushrooms and potentially deadly symptoms may not show in a reasonable amount of time to prevent you from eating more. So if you're 100% certain the mushroom is safe (ideally because you've ate it in the past), eat away, but if you have to guess, it isn't worth it for the relative low amount of calories the mushroom provides.

Beo
11-29-2007, 03:36 PM
To many Chiefs not enough indians... or to many starve'n pilgrims not enough Indians to feed them :D but yeah I may get a bit riled when someone calls me a poser, then I get over it. BTW i'm over it :D

nell67
11-29-2007, 06:49 PM
And...and...Curley Fries don't grow wild neither! (sorry Nell.) Actually, I didn't know they made "Curley" Fries, How about "Moe" Fries, Or "Larry Fries", or "Shemp Fries?" (n'yuk n'yuk):rolleyes:

LOL sarge! too funny,give'em time Somebody will make them somewhere!

spiritman
11-30-2007, 05:43 AM
I liked this thread. Lots of throwing around ideas and expressing points of view. A good (somewhat rousing) discussion (debate) thingy.

FYI all you ppl with your own countries.... your still on planet bob and a part of spiritmangea

trax
11-30-2007, 06:31 PM
First off...WAREAGLE!!! Welcome back, bro! Now stop calling people names you're gettin' them all whiney & s**t

Food of opportunity....if you're stuck in a "survival" situation and you come across a Mickey D's or a bag of apples...chances are you weren't all that lost y'know...more likely you're going to find mushrooms in the forest.

Nativedude
11-30-2007, 09:15 PM
WOW. . .a lot of testosterone being thrown around in here! :eek:

Having taken people out into the woods for the last 28 years (most of them "NEWBIES"), 'shrooms are the last thing that I worry about showing them in a survival situation.

Edible plants, flowers, tubers, roots, barks, etc. are much easier to identify, in greater abundance, and less dangerous. 'Shrooms have a very short span of edibility and many of them look too much like their poisonous cousins to take a chance on showing to someone whom has little or no experience in the woods.

In a primitive living situation, learning the differences between the poisonous and non-poisonous 'shrooms is well worth it, but that comes after many years of practical hands-on experience in the woods, and learning about the edibility and medicinal uses of the plants in the area where one is going to live. . .primitively!

Eat 'em, don't eat 'em, that is a personal choice, but a lot of the posts on here need to be directed to the "NEWBIES" that are asking questions. For the experienced people, you may or may not know which 'shrooms are edible?! Personally, I feel it is better to ayer on the side of caution than to chance getting poisoned or dead from eating something that has nutritional value, albeit very little per 'shroom.

Time spent trapping or snaring rabbits, squirrels, etc. is going to give a lot more nutrition with a lot less expenditure of energy. And while trapping or snaring your time can be better spent building your shelter, or gathering fire wood or water, etc. ;)

wareagle69
12-01-2007, 10:05 PM
beowulf- what are the standing orders for a ranger? that should clarify my position.

next if you took the word poser to mean you well then.....

all i'm saying and this is for the newbies, educate yourselves seek out ppl who know and get the dirttime as i said there are four mushrooms that are very easy to id and do not have poisonous look a likes, all i'm saying is that if lost in the woods while looking for a bag of apples or a mc value meal that i'm sure i would walk past a copious amount of wild food.
now for rabbits yes if you lived only on them then you would starve to death but most survival is short term so i would eat lots of rabbits and shrooms, although here is the ironic thing rabbits can eat the most deadly of shrooms with impunity and have no ill effects.
now boys and girls go read a book or article or look up one thing on the net this week learn and apply.


always be prepared.

wareagle69
12-01-2007, 10:08 PM
i would not trip over a nickel to pick up a dollar. meaning while setting snares and traps pay attention to your surroundings and maybe you could help supplement your diet..

Borelli
12-02-2007, 08:21 PM
juniper berries, prickly pear cactus fruits, hunnysuckle, leeks

Rick
12-02-2007, 08:29 PM
rabbit, squirrel, frog legs, cattails, purslane, pine needle tea, blackberries, persimmons, mulberries.

Sarge47
12-02-2007, 08:47 PM
..well, let me think...Hands down, my favorite is the MOREL!!!!!!;)

sh4d0wm4573ri7
12-03-2007, 06:01 AM
mushrooms are awesome ,, however in a survival situation in my opinion unless your an expert at identity ,,, leave dis one alone , cuz if your wrong you may be dead wrong juss my opinion lol

Beo
12-04-2007, 01:38 PM
i would not trip over a nickel to pick up a dollar.

I like that saying.

trax
12-04-2007, 07:07 PM
being about as military as the cast of the "The Golden Girls" what are the standing orders for a Ranger?

kingfisher71
12-06-2007, 02:13 AM
......While refurbishing a handful of traps I got to wondering weather or not coon would be good to eat. Many years I played around with trapping and had some sucess. I found it pretty easy to catch coons and way more possums than I wanted. It never occured to me to try either one as tablefare. I've seen too many possums eating on some pretty raunchy stuff so I'm not sure how good they'd be. Now a coon, humm??? .....KF71

Smok
12-06-2007, 03:05 AM
Yes they are good just yahoo , coon recipes and you'll see a lot of fund raisers that use coon as the main food or meat.. Have fun , just remember to remove the glans from under the front legs

Rick
12-06-2007, 06:54 AM
Kingfisher - Coon and possum are both good if not a little greasy. But they do add a good compliment of fat to the diet if you are in the bush for a while. Both will eat just about anything. I had a couple of coons attack a can of lard and a bucket of worms on the same night while I was out running bank lines. What a mess when I got back.

I hate generalities but all fur bearing mammals in North America are edible as are all birds.

Rick
12-06-2007, 08:09 AM
Kingfisher - Here is a link to cook up just about anything you catch in your traps, except your fingers, of course.

http://www.wildgamerecipes.org/

Ole WV Coot
12-06-2007, 08:54 AM
Tried both, and I can't say much about them except you don't have to chew. They have enough grease to kinda slide down your throat. Possum is decent if you bake them for 4 hrs on a fresh pine board, throw away the possum and eat the board.

Rick
12-06-2007, 09:22 AM
That is too funny! Clearly, the fresher the pine board the better.

Stealth
12-06-2007, 09:35 AM
haha, ive heard the same recipe for dogfish (bowfin).... its delicious.

Two Rivers
12-06-2007, 10:32 AM
Yes, Racoon is edible. Though I've found the meat most satisfying when hunger is creeping in. Not that they arent good any other time but because of the grease. 3 or 4 days on the trap line and the grease is more than welcome and the drippings makes a great oil candle to light your immediate surroundings on a cold winter night. All mammals are edible.

Two Rivers
12-06-2007, 11:15 AM
I catch myself looking for mayapples whenever I'm squirrel hunting. Sometimes finding them before the deer get to 'em is a chore though. Snapping turtle is another tasty treat though a lot of work to get to. Crawdads....oh boy.

Tony uk
12-06-2007, 12:48 PM
Rosehip syrup is very easy to make and tastes delicious. It also contains 20 times more vitamin C than oranges. When the supply of oranges dwindled during the second world war, many schoolchildren picked rosehips which were then turned into syrup. :)


Rosehips produce their wonderful berries much later than many other plants and Jeremy picked these on the last day of October. Don't pick all of them on the bush as birds rely on them for food during the winter.

1. Wash about a kilo of berries and break off the stalks

2. use a juicer and chop up the rosehips

3. The chopped rosehips should be put into 1.75 litres of boiling water as quickly as possible as the vitamin C begins to break down as soon as the rosehips are damaged.

4. Once the chopped hips are boiling, turn off the gas and allow to stand for 15 minutes. Then pour the mixture through a jelly bag - or, if you don't have one, you can use a pairr of tights, or, a clean tea towel.

5. The syrup that comes out looks remarkably like tomato soup. Add about 750g of sugar and bring to the boil again. Put the chopped rosehips back in the pan, add another litre of water and repeat the straining process. You could probably do this three times and still get goodness out of the rosehips.

6. Bottle the syrup in sterlized bottles. Best to use small ones as the syrup will go off if the bottle is open for too long. Store in a dark place and refridgerate after opening.

I take one of these bottle when i go camping for some time and dont bring much food, Its very good for warding off clinical scurvy (On shorter trips you have a next to nothing risk of getting this) Also it tastes pritty good to :D

On another note as this was something i was going to mention in another post Honey is everlasting survival food, even when it goes hard you just warm it or break it into little chunks and suck on it (very good for sore throats)

trax
12-06-2007, 12:53 PM
that's awesome

Quick question though, what quantity of honey...if you know...can I use to replace the sugar? Or is it a good idea?

trax
12-06-2007, 01:33 PM
I've noticed a couple of responses here, that well....all furbearers/mammals are edible, but some of them taste like s**t, I've never tasted possum, I find raccoon greasy, otter is tough and tastes fishy, because that's an otter's diet. Beaver is greasy, muskrat's kind of spicy and not as greasy as beaver. None of them taste like chicken, lol. Anything those animals ingest is going to affect the taste of their meat. If I shoot a moose or deer in southern Manitoba it's going to taste different than one shot in northern Manitoba or northwestern Ontario or Minnesota etc, the difference in their diets is that great.

Just my two cents worth.

Tony uk
12-06-2007, 01:58 PM
Ive never tryed to replace the sugar, However if you want to try i suggest that you see how man tabelspoons of sugar it takes to get the ammount then add that ammont of tabelspoons of honey. Thats just an idea tho and it might not work

trax
12-06-2007, 02:00 PM
yeah, I think you'd probably use less honey than sugar, but maybe there's some chef on here who knows a conversion formula.

Rick
12-06-2007, 03:08 PM
Well, honey....er..a....What I mean is:

According to:

http://www.realfoodliving.com/sugars.htm

1.2. What are the substitution ratios for the different sugars compared to regular table sugar?

Honey: Substituting honey for sugar seems to be a matter of taste. Some people use it cup for cup, others prefer 1/2 cup - 2/3 cup of honey per cup of white sugar. Reduce the amount of other liquids by 1/4 cup for every cup of honey used. Lower the oven temp about 25 degrees F to prevent over-browning and add 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda for each cup of honey to your batter.n (Honey is naturally acidic and the baking soda tempers it.)

trax
12-06-2007, 03:11 PM
Gee thanks Rick, that was sweet

Rick
12-06-2007, 03:16 PM
Bee nice, Trax. Don't want any rumors to start buzzin'.:rolleyes:

trax
12-06-2007, 03:32 PM
Yeah, especially in a thread about syrup and honey....don't want things to get sticky....

Rick
12-06-2007, 03:48 PM
Uncle! I give.

RobertRogers
12-06-2007, 06:18 PM
coon is very good eating. Fat rich meat in the fall. One of the best.

wareagle69
12-06-2007, 07:41 PM
there are four basic easily identifiable mushrooms without any look a likes that if ppl take the time to educate themselves you do not have to be an "expert" to id shrooms, isn't the point of us being here is to learn so take the time and read something, buy a book, look it up on the net, find someone with experience, go to a school but always, must i stress this always keep an open mind an an attitude of willingness to learn.

always be prepared..

Rick
12-06-2007, 07:48 PM
Okay, and they would be?

wareagle69
12-06-2007, 08:30 PM
1-shaggy mane

2- morrels, easy to tell/learn between the true and the false

3- giant puffball


4-chicken of the woods or sulfur shelf.

look each up on the net or in a book then go out and look. the puffball is the hardest to find, unless you live near farm feilds and cows.

another easy one to learn are the boletes, but would recomend seeking knowledge on those, next year i can walk you thru them easily on the site, with my videos.

trax
12-06-2007, 08:48 PM
Don't you just hate these guys with their well researched, responsible and intelligent answers? Just shut up WE :D :D :D (GAWD I hope someone that tough knows when I'm kidding)

I think one of the important points to bear in mind in these conversations is what exactly we're talking about. If you're starving....seeking out mushrooms is probably not the best way to expend energy. However, if you're outdoorsying around (new word! proud of me? anyone?) and mushrooms are available and you're trying to eat based on what you can harvest in nature then they sure do make a nice addition to the stew.

I've picked and eaten these big-a##ed wild mushrooms up north for years, I've never checked what type or kind they are. One of my mentors showed them to me and if I see some handy, I add them to what I'm cooking....if not...I don't spend a lot of time seeking them out.

The other thing is...you can be doing one of a hundred different chores and come across..wild mushrooms, wild onions, carrots, asparagus....it doesn't take a whole whack of energy to take a few minutes out and pick some. Me? A perfect day would be ..chunking up a ruffed grouse that I just shot and cleaned, throwing it into a pot with some water, stirring in some wild onions and mushrooms and if I have some flour, lard and baking powder, whipping up a bannock that I can cook on a forked stick. OK, I have to go look at a different subject now cuz I'm getting myself hungry.

dilligaf2u2
12-06-2007, 09:30 PM
Who cares!! Just put a mess of them in my omelet!

Don

trax
12-06-2007, 09:35 PM
We should go hiking together Don...If we run into any strange new mushrooms...you can try the omelettes first, LOL

kingfisher71
12-06-2007, 09:59 PM
Hey that all sounds great! Gives me alittle pease of mind. I kinda wondered how one would without grease in the sticks. It's encouraging to know that coon may be a resourse other than just something to eat. BTW, you guys gotta ease up on that muskrat, otter and moose stuff. I gotta think in terms of nutria rat(makes good boudan), alligator and hog. All that other suff is (uh-umm) yankee food and would make me sick to eat it. Just kiddin' I know that's racial....wait, is yankee actually a race?? Hummmm.........Kf71

Smok
12-06-2007, 10:20 PM
Carp are not native to America they where introduce by the Dutch as a food fish and I've heard the board story about them but carp can be good eating as will . I boil most of my coon first and then BBQ them or bake , this removes a lot of fat

Stealth
12-06-2007, 11:40 PM
just make sure you cook them good, i remembered today that they usually carry an unusual parasite burden

Tony uk
12-16-2007, 05:50 PM
All recipies that where previously posted can be found at the links below.

http://www.survivaltopics.com/surviv...make-hardtack/ (http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/how-to-make-hardtack/)

and here:
http://www.survivaltopics.com/surviv...val-power-gel/ (http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/make-your-own-survival-power-gel/)

and other parts of that website.

Tony uk
12-16-2007, 05:51 PM
All previously posted recipies can be found on the site links below

http://www.survivaltopics.com/surviv...make-hardtack/ (http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/how-to-make-hardtack/)

and here:
http://www.survivaltopics.com/surviv...val-power-gel/ (http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/make-your-own-survival-power-gel/)

and other parts of that website.

Rick
12-16-2007, 06:38 PM
Trail Bread Mix

2 Cups flour
1 Tablespoons baking soda
2 Tablespoons sugar
2 Tablespoons Cinnamon
Add enough water to form stiff dough
heat small amount of oil or fat in pan
Add dough and fry, browning on both sides

WOJAPE (Wo zha pee) (Lakota berry pudding)
5 lb. fresh or dried berries (blueberry, raspberry, cherry or a mix)
8 cups of water
2 cups of sugar
cornstarch

To a 5 quart pot add all the berries and smash them (If you are at home, you can use a mashed potato masher or a food processor. If using a food processor, stop just short of puree, you want fine pieces throughout.)

To the smashed berries add the water and sugar. Boil (lightly) this mixture
(Approximately 15 to 20 minutes) until everything is cooked. Thicken to desired thickness with cornstarch that has been dissolved in cold water.

Serve warm and eat with Indian Fry Bread or Trail Bread. Dip the bread into the Wojape and eat in this manner.

Mashed squash (serves 4)

1 1/2 lbs butternut squash
1/4 tsp mace
1/4 tsp allspice
1 tsp ground cardamom
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp melted butter

Cut squash in half, scrape out seeds and fiber. Chunk in 2" pieces. Boil or steam (steaming preserves its high amounts of vitamin C and A better) 20 minutes (boil) or 30 (steam) until tender. Cool slightly, and slip skin off pieces. Spoon flesh into blender, add remaining ingredients and process till smooth. Goes well with roast birds. Fresh-ground black pepper is great on it.

Appleade

Core and cut 2 large apples (don't peel them), and put them in a pan. Meanwhile, bring to a boil 1 quart (1 liter) of water, and pour over the apples. Let the mixture sit for 30 minutes or so. Strain it, and sweeten the drink with sugar. Serve chilled.

Sweet and Sour Roses

Put 1 cup rose petals into a canning jar. Dissolve 1 cup sugar in 1-1/4 cups wine vinegar, adding 1/2 teaspoon each nutmeg, cinnamon, and ground ginger. Bring that mixture to a boil, simmer for a few minutes and pour over the rose petals. Seal tightly and store in a cool spot.

Snow Ice Cream

Fresh snow
sugar (add enough for your taste)
milk (add enough for your taste)
vanilla (add enough for your taste)

Mix all ingredients well and serve it right away in dishes.

Apple Pandowdy (Serves: 10)

12 cups apples
1 1/3 cups sugar, brown
1 teaspoon nutmeg
2 teaspoons cinnamon
8 Tablespoons molasses
1/3 cup water
2 Tablespoons butter
2 cups flour (white or all-purpose)
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoons salt
8 Tablespoons butter
2/3 cup milk

Peel and slice apples. Combine apples, sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, molasses and water in greased dutch oven. Dot with butter.

Prepare shortcake biscuit dough.

Mix flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Cut in butter, blend until mixture resembles cornmeal. Stirring with a fork add enough milk to make soft dough. Continue stirring until all of the flour disappears. Turn out onto a floured board; knead lightly for about 1/2 minute.

Turn smooth side up and roll or pat out to 1/4" thickness to fit dutch oven.

Place on top of apple mixture. Bake in hot oven (350-400) for 35-35 minutes until shortbread is done.

Cicada Granola Chews

15 cicadas
1 cup flour
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 cup butter
1 egg
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
2 1/2 cups Kroger Granola Cereal with Raisins

First freeze cicadas and break off legs and wings etc. Next boil for 5 min. then bake at 550 F for 10min. Take cicadas out and cut up very finely. Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large bowl stir together flour, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, and baking soda. Stir in remaining ingredients except cereal; until smooth. Stir in half of the cereal. Form dough into 1 inch balls and roll in remaining cereal. Place 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 12-14 minutes, or until golden brown.

RobertRogers
12-17-2007, 12:18 AM
Much of this post was taken from from copyrighted material here:
http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/how-to-make-hardtack/

and here:
http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/make-your-own-survival-power-gel/

and other parts of that website.

I suggest you get the permission of the content owner before posting large chunks of other peoples work. The forum could get into big legal problems if content is stolen from the wrong websites in the manner as shown above. I like this forum too much for that to happen.

I think that members of this forum should have available a written policy not to steal content from other sites. A blurb and a link to the original website that has the information is legal but lifting someone elses content could cause many problems for this forum including legal action, big fines, and loss of advertising.

Smok
12-17-2007, 02:28 AM
Thank you RobertRogers

Baxter
12-17-2007, 05:21 AM
so...are there any wild edibles to be found in the winter ?

i never gave much thought into it, because usually when winter hits i forget about wild edibles and turn to trying to get my snares and traps to work. (unsuccessfully i might add.. :rolleyes: )

i know that cat-tail has a bit of it that is edible in all season. i guess the root/tuber would be the edible part in the winter.
And maybe reindeer moss if i can find some kickin' around.

Rick
12-17-2007, 10:17 AM
Wintercress
Field garlic
Garlic mustard
Rose hips (pardon me, yuck, patuey)
cattail shoots
arrowhead tubers

Sarge47
12-17-2007, 10:40 AM
Didn't I start a "recipe" thread already?:confused:

Nativedude
12-17-2007, 10:11 PM
"so. . .are there any wild edibles to be found in the winter ?

i know that cat-tail has a bit of it that is edible in all season. i guess the root/tuber would be the edible part in the winter. . . ."

Cattails are not good in the winter. . .at least not any I've had in the late fall or winter. The tubers were bitter and the shoots were very woody and tough! :confused:

Rick
12-17-2007, 10:20 PM
Native Dude - I look for the small white shoots that come straight out of the rhizome. Cut very thin, I like them in a stew or gumbo. They are a bit chewy eaten raw.

dilligaf2u2
12-18-2007, 04:08 AM
Pine nuts. They are good anytime of the year!

Don

corndog-44
12-19-2007, 03:09 AM
1 1/2 pounds ground deer
2 eggs
1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 cup dry bread crumbs
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/8 tsp pepper
1/2 tsp garlic powder
2 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp spicy brown mustard
2 tbsp vinegar

In a large bowl, lightly beat eggs. Add tomato sauce, onion, bread crumbs, salt, pepper and garlic powder.

Add deer meat and mix well. Press into an ungreased 9 x 5 x 3 loaf pan.

Combine brown sugar, mustard and vinegar; pour over meat loaf.

Bake, uncovered, at 350 degrees for 70 minutes.

trax
12-19-2007, 05:17 PM
I've seen deer, they almost never let their meat loaf.

Rick
12-19-2007, 06:11 PM
Bad dog! Kennel! Now, go on.

Rick
12-19-2007, 07:27 PM
I just ran across this article at:

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/sports-expert/edible-plants-0610.html

"Toss It: Dandelions are high in vitamin A, calcium, and iron and can also be surprisingly tasty. "The trick," says John Kallas, "is to harvest them in late winter or early spring, when they're getting moisture from the soil and very little direct sunlight." Julienne the leaves and sprinkle them onto a salad; boil them for three minutes and eat them like you would cooked greens (it's best to discard the lower third of the leaf); or use the petals to make a dandelion soup."

I eat dandelions all summer long but never thought about using them in the winter. I just thought they froze over winter.

EDIT: I found another article on Native American Cuisine. If you scroll down, there is a list of edible plants with links to articles about most of them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_cuisine

corndog-44
12-19-2007, 09:09 PM
I've seen deer, they almost never let their meat loaf.

I saw a couple of deer today that let their meat loaf...come to think about it, maybe they were taking a break from foraging.

Sarge47
12-19-2007, 09:29 PM
Anybody catch the news blurb about the guy who found the Deer in his living room when he came home from walking his dog? He had to wrestle it to the floor! It had messed itself up pretty bad breaking through a window and had to be put dow. The guy's saying he's having that Deer for Christmas dinner!:cool:

Rick
12-20-2007, 06:57 AM
That's pretty forgiving, Sarge. I mean the guy finds a deer that's broken into his house and then invites him to dinner? What a sweet guy.

Rick
12-20-2007, 07:44 AM
I found a really great site with a lot of information on edible plants. There are a couple of dead links on it but a lot that do work and lead to other good sources (including this forum).

http://therucksack.tripod.com/edibleplants.htm

Bon Appetite!

Baxter
12-20-2007, 08:44 AM
coooool, thanks a lot people, and thanks for the links Rick !

corndog-44
12-20-2007, 09:33 AM
2 lbs. turtle meat, cut into 2-4 inch pieces
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1 tsp. salt
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup plus 1 tbsp. milk
2 eggs, separated
2 tsp. Bacon fat
1/8 tsp. salt
I pt. Wesson oil


Combine turtle, vinegar, and 1 tsp. salt. Cover with water; simmer 1 hour or until tender. Drain and set aside.

Combine flour, milk, egg yolks, olive oil, and 1/8 tsp. salt; mix well. Beat egg whites until stiff; fold into batter.

Dip turtle pieces into batter; fry until golden brown in deep oil heated to 375 degrees F. Drain well on paper towels. Yield: 4-6 servings.

wareagle69
12-20-2007, 09:06 PM
yo baxter i think that orangevill has a wild edibles club also look up ontario wild edibles and aslo common lawn mushrooms also go to wildwood survival he is ontario based great info he has lots of websites..

Baxter
12-21-2007, 05:19 AM
yep, i already know about wildwood survival, i had already checked the wild edibles there but it hadn't mentioned any of the plants that would be edible in winter. it is a great site though. and i'm gonna check the orangeville club, i think i may have stumbled upon there site once....

thanks wareagle.

Rick
12-21-2007, 12:40 PM
I took some time and browsed through my field guide of edible plants and pulled out only those that are edible during the winter months. I looked for any plant that said All Year or any that specified the winter season. This information comes from:

Edible Wild Plants of Eastern/Central North America. A Peterson Field Guide

I highly recommend this book. There is just a ton of information in it.

A couple of words of caution. I make no claims about the validity of the information. Many of these plants I have never eaten or identified in the field so I don't want your survivors to send their process server to my door because you croaked on something. Also, the field guide offers cautionary statements on some of these plants because they can sting or cause a dermatological reaction if touched. That sort of stuff. In addition, there are look alike plants for some of these that are poisonous. KNOW WITH CERTAINTY WHAT YOU ARE HARVESTING BEFORE YOU EAT IT! If in doubt leave it alone. That said:

Edible Winter Plants

Labrador Tea leaves
Horseradish roots
Watercress leaves and stems
Spurge Nettle – Tread Softly tubers
Spikenard, Life-of-Man roots
Wintergreen, Checkerberry leaves
Wild Leek or Ramp bulbs
Day Lilly tubers
Water or Purple Avens roots
Black Crowberry fruit
Wild Onion bulbs
Groundnut tubers
Lamb’s Quarter, Pigweed seeds (fall - early winter)
Amaranths seeds (fall – early winter)
Cattail (small horned shaped sprouts at the end of the root stock) winter,
Cranberry fruit
Balsam Fir pitch
Pines needles
Black Crowberry fruit (late summer – winter)
Saw Palmetto terminal bud
Wild Raisins fruit
Yaupon, Cassina leaves
American Hackberry fruit
Common Spicebush twigs and bark
Redbay leaves
Sycamore Sap (late winter)
Creeping Snowberry, Moxie-Plum leaves
Wintergreen Chuckerberry leaves
Chufa, Yellow Nut Grass tubers
Dulse fronds
Irish Moss fronds
Edible Kelp midrib, lateral fronds
Laver fronds
Sea Lettuce fronds
Rock Tripe entire plant
Reindeer Moss entire plant
Iceland Moss entire plant

There is no doubt some plants are missing from this list. Some indicated the plant was good during a specific month, December for example, and I did not include it. If you learn how to identify all of these there's little chance you'll go hungry while in the bush.

Beo
12-21-2007, 02:07 PM
How many egg yokes, how much olive oil? Cause I'll try it.

corndog-44
12-21-2007, 02:42 PM
Eggs yokes from the 2 separated eggs. 2 tsp. olive oil.

corndog-44
12-21-2007, 05:09 PM
Wild Goose
Salt and pepper
Chopped onions
Chopped celery
Apple slices
Thin bacon slices
Dry red wine
Flour for gravy

Allow one pound of Goose per person. Dry them thoroughly inside and out and rub inside with salt. Fill the insides with onions, apple and celery. Place in an uncovered roasting pan, cover breasts with bacon. Add dry red wine and cook in a 325 degree oven for 10-12 minutes per pound for rare Gooses (really marvelous), 15-20minutes per pound for well done. Baste frequently with drippings to which the dry red wine was added.

Mix cold water with drippings and thicken with flour for gravy.

Pan
12-21-2007, 09:19 PM
i've never eaten goose but here is how my grand dad told was the only way to cook it.

1 cleaned goose
1 large presure cooker
1 cedar plank
salt and pepper

Salt and pepper goose. split cedar plank in two pieces and place in gooses cavity. Place goose and plank in cooker and seal. Cook for 2 hours. Let cooker cool. open , discard goose and eat the board! serves 2

I guess he didnt like goose.
but your recipemakes me doubt ole Gran Dad

Rick
12-21-2007, 10:41 PM
You would be hard pressed to find anything greasier than a goose. But I will say this, there is nothing better for a cold than goose grease generously applied to the chest and covered with a flannel rag!

MedicineWolf
12-21-2007, 10:43 PM
I've eaten the stems and bulbs of lilly pads all year round, they are a tad bit bitter but easily found in ponds and along rivers here in Montana. Have a slightly bitter taste but not that bad and great for throwing in stews.

Pan
12-21-2007, 10:57 PM
here there are wild mustard greens and dandilions are in bloom (South Alaqbama) look here for my pics of them http://www.freewebs.com/clarkshomestead/wildedibles.htm

Pan
12-21-2007, 11:28 PM
My nephew just told me that he was watching somthing last night that said if you have to eat a partner, eat the liver. Most nutritious part.

Rick
12-21-2007, 11:28 PM
Still in bloom? Dude, that is just sooooo wrong. There's snow on the ground for pity's sake. Well, at least here there is.

Rick
12-21-2007, 11:30 PM
Did you look at him with an insidious smile and just agree? "Where exactly is your liver, nephew? Can you point it out for me?"

Or just say, "I've always thought so."

Pan
12-21-2007, 11:35 PM
last time it snowed here was like 1995. those pics were taken yesterday (new site)

Rick
12-21-2007, 11:39 PM
Well the site is sweet. You did a nice job. Now, about not snowin' since 1995. Is Alabama actually in the U.S.?:rolleyes:

nell67
12-22-2007, 02:53 AM
You would be hard pressed to find anything greasier than a goose. But I will say this, there is nothing better for a cold than goose grease generously applied to the chest and covered with a flannel rag!
You have never eaten racoon then ,eh Rick? greasy.

nell67
12-22-2007, 03:00 AM
As far as painting the hutches go Pan (checked out your site) just remember ,the rabbits are gonna chew on everything around them,paint included,so painting them may not be such a good idea.

Baxter
12-22-2007, 08:11 AM
wow, thanks Rick. you really didn't have to take that time to browse the book for me. thank you very much. that is really helpful. i gotta find me a copy of that book.
thanks again guys.

wareagle69
12-22-2007, 08:36 AM
chapters i know they have em in T O

Rick
12-22-2007, 12:12 PM
Indeed I have. I think I posted somewhere else on that. Anyway, I agree, a coon is a greasy little critter but so is a fat goose.

Pan
12-22-2007, 07:36 PM
As far as painting the hutches go Pan (checked out your site) just remember ,the rabbits are gonna chew on everything around them,paint included,so painting them may not be such a good idea.

Yea I was mainly talkin about painting the exterior. But had considered the inside too because it wil be easier to sanitize. But thanks for the thought. Ill probably paint the inside too and make sure they have plenty of toys and chew wood. Maybe it'll go well. If not I guess I'll build all wire cages next time. But with free Materials, hey, if they last a year or two and dont make my rabbits sick... Kool

Pan
12-22-2007, 09:31 PM
Yea got the ever last night so today i went a picked some Dandelion and mustard and coocked up a big pot with some ham hock. I ate it all and drank the flavorfull liquer. Man was it good. I may have over done it a little though. Did I mention that dandelion and mustard are both GOOD COLON CLEANSERS! So anyone who is in a survival situation eat in moderation till your stomach is tuned in to the wild again.

corndog-44
12-24-2007, 01:03 AM
2 pounds carp fillets
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup biscuit mix or pancake mix
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon dried lemon flakes

Method:
Take your carp fillets and cut them into chunks. Place each chunk fillet piece into a shallow dish or pan for coating. Next you will pour the buttermilk over the chunk fillet pieces. Allow the fish to stand for a half hour in the buttermilk, making sure to turn the pieces over once during that time. Stir the salt into the biscuit mix. Remove the fillets from the buttermilk and coat them in the biscuit mix. Cover both sides. Fry the carp fillets in a deep fryer or hot oil in a frying pan will do. Fry the pieces for 5 - 10 minutes until they are both cooked through and brown on all sides. (Note: If the oil is too hot, the fillets will brown too fast and not cook through.) Remove them to drain on paper towels. Serve the fillets with lemon wedges, or sauce if desired.

Serves 4-6

Rick
12-24-2007, 01:20 AM
Aw, jeese, Corndog. Carp? Those things have so many bones it scares an orthopedic surgeon. Grinnell are too skinny. Dogfish, well they just look so sad with those pouty little lips hanging down. How 'bout Long John Silvers?

Sarge47
12-24-2007, 01:23 AM
Aw, jeese, Corndog. Carp? Those things have so many bones it scares an orthopedic surgeon. Grinnell are too skinny. Dogfish, well they just look so sad with those pouty little lips hanging down. How 'bout Long John Silvers?

Carp is just "Crap" misspelled!:rolleyes:

corndog-44
12-24-2007, 03:55 AM
One good thing about trash fish is there are no limits or seasons...fits well with wilderness survival.

I like my carp around 7-10 lbs. It's a good idea to remove the midlateral strip of darker flesh before cooking; it can infuse the meat with a strong, musky flavor. Carp bakes, fries, and poaches nicely but I don't care for canned carp. The draw-back of carp is the mossy, earthy flavor sometimes evident in carp tends to be stronger in the warmer months; carp harvested from November to April will have less of a river-bottom taste.

Two Rivers
12-24-2007, 09:10 AM
Some folks in Pa. would catch suckers in early spring. While the water is still cold. Claiming their bones were softer at this time. Grind them up and make fish patties with them. I've tried them and they werent to bad. But that was the first and last time I ever tried 'em. I Love to fish but can wait for a nice catfish or bass or anything that aint got lips the size of my washing machine boot. However in a pinch ..............

Rick
12-24-2007, 10:47 AM
Hmmm. Maybe there's a reason that carp don't have a season or a limit.:rolleyes:

Rick
12-26-2007, 08:51 PM
If you are cooking over a campfire, here's a handy reference chart to guage the temperature of the fire

Temp.............Type of Fire........# of Secs you can hold your hand over coals
250-325..............Slow..................6 - 8 sec
325-400..............Medium..............4 - 5 sec
400-500..............Hot...................2 - 3 sec
> 500.................Very Hot............1 sec

You can also use the "Mississippi" test. Holding your hand 20 inches over the coals, count 1 Mississippi, 2 Mississippi, 3 Mississippi and so on. A medium to slow fire will let you hold you hand over the coals about 6 counts. A hot fire only 2 or 3.

RBB
12-27-2007, 02:13 AM
There is a portion of cat-tails that is edible in winter, but retrieving it takes time and effort.

There is always reindeer moss - at least that's what I think it is called - the cancerous warty tubular looking stuff that grows on rocks all over the Canadian shield. Tasteless and terrible, it will keep you alive. You can also make spruce tea - which will give you vitamins including (I believe) vitamin C.

corndog-44
12-27-2007, 04:11 AM
10 pounds crawfish
2 3-ounce packages Crab Boil Seasoning
4 ears corn, each cut into 3-inch pieces
1 1/2 pounds small red potatoes
1 gallon water
1 large lemon, cut into quarters
8 medium white onions, peeled
4 artichokes, each cut in half
3 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1/4 cup hot sauce (Louisiana hot sauce, Baumer Foods Crystal or McIlhenny Tabasco)
1/2 cup salt or Creole Seasoning
1 pound andouille sausage or kielbasa, cut into 2-inch pieces

In very large saucepot with removable wire basket, heat water, crab boil, salt, hot sauce and lemon to boiling. Add onions, artichokes, carrots and potatoes; heat to boiling. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Carefully remove vegetables.

To boiling mixture, add corn, crawfish and sausage; over high heat to boiling. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 5 to 8 minutes until crawfish are tender. Carefully remove.

To serve, arrange vegetables, crawfish and sausage on large platter or place on newspaper or brown paper. Serve with plenty of cold beer and French bread.

Serves 8.

corndog-44
12-31-2007, 08:50 AM
What is your usual menu when out and about in the woods? Mine is wild meat or fish, bread cooked in a skillet and coffee.

canid
12-31-2007, 09:16 AM
always take sticky cornbread, bannock [pretty much bread product you can mix ahead of time, add water and cook in a pan or over/under embers, which is a long list], coffee or yerba mate, brown sugar, nuts, a bag of my secret curry mix, dried greens during deep summer, or winter if i'm in a northern/montaine area and beyond that, it sort of depends on what i have on hand.

i usualy try to use what greens, roots, fruit, nuts and meat i can find localy where it is available. if there are rivers or lakes or an ocean nearby, i tend to plan my trips around them. there is a tlingit/haida proverb that when the tide is out, the beach will be your table and when the tide is in; the forest.

Sarge47
12-31-2007, 10:04 AM
On a simple "day-hike" I take a full MRE pouch Otherwise I camp from my car so I take all kinds of stuff! If it were a Backpacking trip I'd take "freeze-dried" food to cut down on the weight.:cool:

canid
12-31-2007, 10:21 AM
oh man that's foul. nothin' like constipating MREs and mountain house to motivate me to find some real food.

Sarge47
12-31-2007, 10:24 AM
oh man that's foul. nothin' like constipating MREs and mountain house to motivate me to find some real food.

You're starting to sound like my wife!:D Us old guys are tough! I even drink from a Nalgene bottle!:rolleyes:

canid
12-31-2007, 10:35 AM
http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/956871/2/istockphoto_956871_camp_cooking.jpg > http://www.mediabistro.com/unbeige/original/mre.jpg

Sarge47
12-31-2007, 10:49 AM
Oh look honey! A real live campfire! I guess they let people have those in California, unlike where we live. Such a thing here would invite a visit from the local "PO-PO" and a stiff fine! Maybe that's why California is being plauged with all those Wildfires!:rolleyes: That MRE looks delicious though! YUM!:D

FVR
12-31-2007, 11:46 AM
Really depends on what time of year. In the fall, tea bags, jerky, nuts, some kind of bread, I can forage for black, hack, rasberries and muscadines and persimmons. I have caught trout and eaten them for lunch, but with a pole it's no gaurantee.

In the winter, tea bags, jerky, nuts and dried fruit, throw in some grits or oat meal, try to take smoked meat or fish. I have tried fishing with a pole to no use so I mainly depend on what I take in. Also, depending on hunting, in this day and time will leave you hungry, well in my part of the woods. Yeh, a squirrel, rabbit, hog, deer season is usually over when I go in the woods. But, hunting is no gaurantee.

Did have a good meal of bobcat years ago, gent shot one making his way to camp.

Ya'll can keep those mre's, I've eaten my share in life and care not to anymore.


Oh yeh, and with the drought, don't get caught making a fire.

nell67
12-31-2007, 11:49 AM
Still no rain FVR?

Proud American
12-31-2007, 11:51 AM
Claifornias always low on water there about to start "reclamin" are water here in Orange County, basicly gettin old water already used and put alot of chemicals in it and put it in are taps!

FVR
12-31-2007, 12:02 PM
We've had rain alright, but we are still in very bad drought conditions.

It's not the water used in day to day consumption, but rather the water being used in the elec. plants throughout the state. Cut back on the elec. helps more for saving water than taking a quick shower.

FVR
12-31-2007, 12:04 PM
We use to sneak up to a water hole, high fenced in area off El Toro rd. and fish for catfish back in the 80's. They actually had police guarding it.