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owl_girl
04-19-2007, 07:37 PM
Yes it is important to know the poisonous species of snakes in your aria but what abut how to treat them, yes get to the hospital ASAP, but itís not always immediately available. If your hiking in the middle of nowhere it could be a long time before you get there. Itís important to know what to do and even more important to know what not to do. Thereís a lot of old, out of date methods on how to treat rattlesnake bites, many of which we now know are dangerous and can cause even more damage! When my family and me moved to the upper Midwest we knew there were going to be rattlesnakes. They arenít that common but I have seen a few. Almost stepped on one when I was running on a hiking trail but I heard its rattle at the last secant and jumped back startled, but then so was the snake judging on how fast it took off. It doesnít bother me that much that we have them here but still its smart to be prepared so I looked up what to do in case of a rattlesnake bite and hereís what Iíve learned.

Of cores stay calm, one way you can help your self do this is by remembering that rattlesnake bites are rarely fatal even when there not treated. Even in severe cases it usually takes hours before you start to go unconscious, giving you lots of time to fined help. Also you should know 25 % of rattlesnake bites are dry bites with no venom injected.

Keep the affected limb lower than the heart.

Treat for shock and preserve body heat.

Remove any shoes, rings, watches or other restricting items from the bitten limb. It will swell.

Apply a light constricting band a couple inches above and below the bite, however never place the bands on either side of a joint (such as above and below the knee or elbow). The band should be made up of wide, soft material, like a handkerchief or shredded clothing. The purpose of constricting bands is to restrict lymphatic flow, not blood, so they should not be too tight. It should be loose enough to stick a finger between you and the band. Readjust them as necessary when they tighten due to swelling.

Do not apply cold and/or ice packs. Recent studies indicate that application of cold or ice makes the injury much worse.

Donít cut the bite. The additional tissue damage may actually increase the diffusion of the toxins throughout the body.

Never try to suck out the venom by mouth. If you donít want the venom in your body you donít want in it your mouth. It can seep into your blood stream and youíd be spreading it in an even worst way. You could try the suction cup in a snakebite kit if it doesn't delay other needed treatment. Suctioning seldom provides any measurable advantages though.

Donít apply a tight tourniquet. Such action can result in the loss of the limb.

Wash the wound if you can

If you see this plant,
http://www.dgsgardening.btinternet.co.uk/plantain2.JPG http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/assets/organicweeds/plantago%20major2.jpg
Broad-leaved Plantain a common weed which grows throughout the US, pick it, mash/ chew the leaves and put the pulp on the bite. It will absorb some of the poison. But if you donít see it donít spend to much valuable time looking for it, you could have a friend go look for it quick but he needs to get you to a hospital ASAP.

If you really donít like snakes you could get some guinea foul http://www.bigstockphoto.com/thumbs/0/7/4/medium/470406.jpg I hear they love to eat snakes!

Sleazy_E
04-20-2007, 01:24 AM
Great thread..... I did not know that those plants would help rid the body of venom.... I have those growing in my yard....

owl_girl
04-20-2007, 03:30 AM
Iím glad you liked it :D

bear
04-20-2007, 06:28 AM
Thanks for the info. I have those weeds all over the place. I guess there is a purpose for just about everything. bear

owl_girl
04-20-2007, 05:00 PM
Yes but make sure you pack A LOT on for something as severe as a rattlesnake bite. And keep packing to get as much venom out as possible.

wolf
04-21-2007, 02:58 PM
well thats something I didn't know. nice thread

owl_girl
05-12-2007, 03:51 PM
In the 18th and 19th century people would try rattlesnake master roots as an antidote but no evidence has been found to show that they actually work. I havenít seen rattlesnake master growing where I live and I donít know much about the plant or its medical properties. Broad-leaved Plantain is good for drawing out any toxins out of the skin like poison ivy and blood poisoning. I wonder if backing powder or backing Soda would help for little bites, I remember using it for bee stings as a kid. Don't know if backing Soda will really make that much of a difference though.

Anyways this is a photo of rattlesnake master.
http://www.epa.gov/greenacres/plants/images/rattle2.jpg

marberry
05-30-2007, 10:59 AM
if i was bit id immediately apply a tourniquet and open a vein close to the bite so it could bleed out , i prepair for that sorta thing though so i dont think id have 2 worry , metal boots and extremially long strong thick pants. and i always carry a machete with me so i could pin the snake with a forked stick, chop its head off and cook it , snakes taste great lol

owl_girl
05-30-2007, 03:19 PM
if i was bit id immediately apply a tourniquet and open a vein close to the bite so it could bleed out

Those methods are out of date. Youíd loose your limb. If you do what I recommended in the first post youíd likely save your limb and your life. You midis well cut your limb off otherwise. Iíd do more research if I were you.

marberry
05-30-2007, 11:29 PM
im not gona get biten by a snake though lol i have puncture proof low pants and metal boots , and if the snake gets 2 close ill pin it with a forked branch and use my machette to chop its head off , rattlesnake is suposed 2 tast rly good lol

owl_girl
05-31-2007, 03:01 AM
Hmm Iíve never had rattlesnake. If you eat one let me know how it tastes

marberry
05-31-2007, 10:49 AM
yeah i would unfortunately i no longer live in kamloops (they have an enormous rattlesnake population) which is the only place iv evr seen one.

aviator survivalist
06-09-2007, 02:25 AM
actually i heard rattlers taste like chicken. alot of snakes are eddible too and I belive they have a fairly good amount of protein and calories in them. :)

sh4d0wm4573ri7
06-09-2007, 05:14 AM
rattlers do somewhat taste like chickin (cut a vein ? let it bleed out ?) lmao cmon I'd be better off not doin anything then doin that . I know firsthand of a few men who were bittin by copperhead and they didnt die I do recommend any treatment be as owl girl recomends .

FVR
06-09-2007, 11:19 AM
I don't know, rattlesnake just tastes like rattlesnake. I've eaten a few on lrrps and they were a treat, as were the rabbits and squirrels taken with snares.

I would rec. treatment for any and all snake bites. Watched a guys arm puff up like a balloon once. My good friend from La. who grew up in the bayous educated me on snakes and since then, I just stay away from them.

Most people will live through the poison injected into their bodies. It is the after effects of the enzymes they inject into your skin that pains you. Cottonmouths or water mocs are the worse. You can have a lengthy stay in the hospital not because of the poison, but because the rotting flesh falling off your legs.


Rattlesnakes usually let you know they're there.
Copperheads are chickens, you will usually see them leaving the area.
Water mocs or cottonmouths, will chase you. Very aggressive. Been there, done that and glad I had leather gloves on.
In Ga. we have these little coral snakes that are very deadly. Only good thing is that their fangs are located way back in their mouth which makes it hard for them to bite you. They will bite you, and bite you, and bite you, and hopefully you will notice it before they break through the clothing and into your skin.

Pers. I'm more paranoid about black widows and brown recluses. Black widows, you get bit, you get the anti venom and that's it. You get bit a second time, you go to the hospital and stay awhile. Only get the anti venom once in your life. Brown recluses will just make your life miserable for a long period of time.

jessielavon
04-19-2009, 11:55 PM
We always wear our snake champs when were in the woods,tuck out paints into out boots and duck tape around out collor,sleeves and paints

Jay
04-20-2009, 12:12 AM
Pers. I'm more paranoid about black widows and brown recluses. .

I'm paranoid about widows too.....black, brow, white.....it makes on never mind.....all very dangerous. Yup....stay away from the widows!

Stairman
04-20-2009, 12:59 AM
Owl Girl is right. Do not cut, do not suck. I too am more affraid of Black Widows and Brown Recluse spiders. Moccasins would be next. They act like they want to bite you. Most other snakes do not.

Deep South
08-30-2009, 07:54 PM
I am from South Louisiana and live throwing distance to the nearest water moccasin. Fortunately I have never been bitten, but have had hunting dogs bitten several times. Dogs handle the bites a lot better than ppl do I understand. We use benadryl for the dogs and get them to the vet if we can. I have never lost a dog to a snake bite yet. I have heard that hydracortozone pills will buy you some time with viper bites. Anyone have any experience with this ?

crashdive123
08-30-2009, 07:59 PM
Hey Deep South - how about slithering on over to the Introduction Section and tell us a bit about yourself. Thanks. http://www.wilderness-survival.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=14

rebel_chick
08-30-2009, 08:17 PM
I was told that if your horse got bite by a rattlesnake that you could put mud on it and I would help draw the poison out and keep it cool. Horses aren't particularly reactive to snake bites but was wondering if anyone else heard of this?

wareagle69
08-30-2009, 08:37 PM
horses are usually fine when bitten, just the sheer size alone,from most viper bites, now if bite by a cobra maybe differnt story, but as far as the rattleheadedcoppermoccisans they are usually fine bareing any health issues, wanna know the problem that kills the horses and cattle

horse; just grazing along minding my onw buisness chewing some tender blades
snake; holy crap whats that big vibration coming towards me, maybe i'll make some noise
horse; hmm wonder what that noise is, maybe i should sniff it, see if its edible
snake; look dude can't you hear me?
horse; ooh look at that blade of grass by the noisy thing, just a little nibble
snake; ok i warned ya. strike.
horse; jumps back in surprise, hey what the... that hurt. wonder what that was, maybe i'll take a closer look
snake; ok but i'm gonna bite again.

it's not the first bite but these big critters can be so dumb sometimes, 2 or 3 bites can be fatal, and usually because they are bite on the nose and the airway closes, which is why horsefolks in snake country carry a rubber tube, so they can shove it down the horses nose and keep an open airway

pocomoonskyeyes
08-30-2009, 08:57 PM
Having given lectures in a Serpentarium I would like to throw my two cents in. Owl Girl is absolutely Right. Only this isn't new, it's about 15 or twenty years old. It saddens me how long some of this Medical treatment stuff takes to "get out". Crash there's a man down your way Maynard something or something Maynard, Sorry but I may be getting oldtimers. He is an expert in Snakebites. He came out with these treatment guidelines back around 1990 or maybe a few years earlier. This is the advice we gave out at the Swamp when I worked there from 1990-1994.
Another reason you DON'T want to suck the venom out. Every time you brush your teeth or eat a potato chip you scratch your gums. So if you've been bitten on the arm and you suck the venom out you have effectively transferred the venom from your arm to your mouth. You don't have to be a doctor to realize you have just made the situation even worse.

Now as to what FVR said about the Coral snake which is the most venomous snake in the US. If it scratches your skin with it's front teeth and it has released venom in it's mouth. Then it doesn't matter where it's Fangs are located,you have just been "envenomated", you now have Coral Snake Venom in your bloodstream. Coral Snakes are related to Cobras and this should give you an idea of how serious they can be.
One more thing for those who are in a Survival scenario The deeper you can bury the head the better off you are. Why? Let's say you bury it and a Raccoon comes along and digs it up a week later and you step on it. you need to treat it as if the snake were alive and just bit you. The venom crystallizes and even a year later is still potent enough to harm you. When your liquid blood mixes with the crystallized venom, it liquefies it and mixes and enters your bloodstream. Just so you know.

Deep South
08-30-2009, 09:04 PM
I thought I had......

crashdive123
08-30-2009, 09:06 PM
Nope. You didn't. Just follow the link I gave you and you'll see what I mean.

Ole WV Coot
08-30-2009, 09:25 PM
My part of the country mostly copperheads and rattlers depending on your location. I still have the habit of blousing my pants and Carharts, not the ones made in China turned one rattler without getting to my skin. Bitten one time by a copperhead and only got sick to my stomach, probably had used most of his venom up already. Really never did anything for coon hounds they just swelled up for a few days and got better. I guess prevention is the best. I know of only one death in Northern VA where I once lived, a 6yr old girl bitten by a copperhead. Bites are few and far between in this area most everyone knows where to watch and copperheads can be smelled by a human, smells like cucumbers.

pocomoonskyeyes
08-30-2009, 09:29 PM
My part of the country mostly copperheads and rattlers depending on your location. I still have the habit of blousing my pants and Carharts, not the ones made in China turned one rattler without getting to my skin. Bitten one time by a copperhead and only got sick to my stomach, probably had used most of his venom up already. Really never did anything for coon hounds they just swelled up for a few days and got better. I guess prevention is the best. I know of only one death in Northern VA where I once lived, a 6yr old girl bitten by a copperhead. Bites are few and far between in this area most everyone knows where to watch and copperheads can be smelled by a human, smells like cucumbers.

You are right Coot the people at highest risk of death are the very young and the older people,whose Immune system has either not fully developed or has started to break down.

pocomoonskyeyes
08-30-2009, 09:36 PM
I just remembered!!! Maynard Cox is the name of the Snakebite expert.

Deep South
08-30-2009, 09:41 PM
There ya go Crash..... I was wondering if anyone has or heard of anyone using hydocortazone to slowdown the affects of a bite.. My vet swears by it for dogs and I have used benadryl successfully a few times for both water mocs and ground rattlers.. The swelling on the dogs goes down within 45 min ... Compared to days without treatment. I thought it was pretty impressive the amount of time it took for the swelling to go down. Just hoping it would work on a human similarly at least slow down the sickness that's going to happen.